Open carry--legally--while speeding--with 4 kids in car--and under the influence

Quite a combination!

<<<A Georgia Republican faces a new challenge in his re-election campaign after his arrest on drunken driving charges.

State Rep. Tom Taylor (R-Dunwoody) was stopped April 7 for driving 72 mph in a 45-mph zone with four children in his vehicle, reported the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.


The 54-year-old Taylor had a blood-alcohol content of .225, which is nearly three times higher than the legal limit of .08, and was legally carrying a gun on his hip at the time of his arrest.>>>

Tom Taylor

Original Post

State Representative Terry Spicer (D) pleaded guilty to accepting more than $3000 per month in bribes. (2011)

State Representative Richard Miranda (D) pleaded guilty to wire fraud and tax evasion.[4] (2012)

State Representative Ben Arredondo (D) was charged with bribery, fraud and extortion. He was sentenced to 18 months of house arrest. (2012)

Nogales Mayor Octavio Garcia Von Borstel (D), and his father, Octavio Garcia Suarez, were arrested on fraud, theft and money laundering charges. He was ultimately convicted of bribery charges and received a three and a half year prison term. He was sentenced to seven years probation on the fraud charges

State Senator Paul Bookout (D) pleaded guilty to mail fraud. (2014)

State Treasurer Martha Shoffner (D) convicted on the charges of extortion and bribery and sentenced to 30 months. (2014)

State Senator Leland Yee (D) charged with bribery, public corruption and gun trafficking.(2014)

State Senator Roderick Wright (D) was convicted of eight counts of perjury and voter fraud. He was sentenced to 90 days and barred him from ever holding public office again and will be required to perform 1,500 hours of community service and three years’ probation under the terms of his conviction. (2014)  

State Assemblywoman Mary Hayashi (D) She was charged with felony grand theft after being caught on video surveillance allegedly shoplifting $2,445 worth of merchandise from San Francisco's Neiman Marcus store. She was sentenced to $180 fine and three years probation and was ordered to stay more than 50 feet from the store. (2011)

Mayor of San Diego Bob Filner (D) given three months of house arrest, three years probation, and partial loss of his mayoral pension after pleading guilty to state charges of false imprisonment and battery. (2013)

Port St. Lucie Mayor Patricia Christensen (D) was convicted of theft of campaign funds. In a guilty plea agreement, she was sentenced to probation. (2011

North Miami Mayor Lucie Tondreau (D) was convicted in December, 2014 on felony charges of participating in an $11 million mortgage fraud scheme. She faces up to 30 years in prison for conspiracy and wire fraud convictions. Her sentencing is scheduled for March 20, 2015

State Senator Charles Walker (D), was convicted of 127 felony charges related to various schemes. Walker paid $698,047 in restitution and another $200,000 in fines and court fees. (2013)

Kentucky

  • FBI Operation Boptrot was an investigation into bribery and the horse racing industry. Approximately 10% of Kentucky's legislature, both the house and senate, was implicated in this scandal, some taking bribes for as little as $100. (1992) Legislators convicted as a result of Operation Boptrot included
  • House Speaker Don Blandford (D) pleaded guilty after 1992 indictment on charges of extortion, racketeering and lying. He was sentenced to 64 months in prison and was fined $10,000.
  • Rep. Jerry Bronger (D) was indicted in 1992 and later pleaded guilty to charges that he accepted $2,000 in exchange for blocking legislation that would hurt harness race tracks. He was sentenced to 10 months in prison.
  • Rep. Clay Crupper (D) pleaded guilty after 1992 indictment and was fined $10,000 on charges of interstate travel in aide of racketeering.
  • Sen. Helen Garrett (D) was charged in 1992 with taking a $2,000 bribe from a track in exchange for helping pass legislation. She pleaded guilty and received four years probation.
  • Sen. John Hall (D) pleaded guilty to conspiracy and other charges stemming from 1992 indictment in Operation BopTrot.
  • Sen. David LeMaster (D) was indicted in 1993, and acquitted of extortion and racketeering, but convicted of lying. He was sentenced to a year in prison and fined $30,000, but served just one day after resigning from the legislature.
  • Rep. Bill McBee (D) was sentenced to a 15-month prison term for his role in Operation BopTrot.
  • Sen. Virgil Pearman (D) pleaded guilty after 1993 indictment charging that he took an illegal $3,000 campaign contribution. He was sentenced to three months in a halfway house, probation and was fined $5,000.
  • Rep. Bill Strong (D) pleaded guilty after 1993 indictment charges that he took an illegal $3,000 campaign contribution and did not deposit the money into his campaign fund. He was sentenced to three months in a halfway house, probation and was fined $3,000.
  • Sen. Patti Weaver (D) pleaded guilty after 1993 indictment charging that she was promised help finding a job in exchange for support of legislation. She was sentenced to weekend incarceration, probation and community service and was fined $10,000.
direstraits posted:

Concealed carry, while under the influence, is illegal in most states.  I suspect the same is true in Georgia for open carry.

___

I inadvertently omitted the link to this story.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/s...-rabun-county/nq5b4/

 It reports the following:

"Taylor was stopped at 2:45 p.m. on April 7 for driving 72 mph in a 45 mph zone with four juveniles in his SUV, according to the police report. Officer Michael Bennett reported that Taylor exited his vehicle and was legally carrying a gun on his hip."

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/s...-rabun-county/nq5b4/

His weapon was not concealed.  He was wearing it on his hip.  Georgia law prohibits possession of a firearm under certain circumstances, but strangely not simply while driving under the influence. Here are two sources of gun law in Georgia; search them all you wish and I do not believe you will find what you have described for either open-carry or concealed carry.

http://www.georgiapacking.org/GaCode/

http://www.lexisnexis.com/hott...s/gacode/Default.asp

 

 

jtdavis posted:

Jack, what has all that post got to do with the Georgia guy exercising his second amendment rights?

___

JT, of course those pasted up incidents of Democrats in trouble with the law for various offenses--none of which had to do with guns or alcohol--have nothing at all to do with the DUI/speeding arrest of the astonishingly irresponsible Georgia Republican Representative Tom Taylor.  The preternaturally daffy and irrelevant Jack Flash is simply invoking the "so's yer old man" gambit  thinking, in his childish way, that it has meaning in this discussion. By now you will have noticed that Jack's brain is not wired in a normal configuration, so you will have to take that very limiting factor into account as you encounter the inchoate blithering nonsense with which he so often and so unabashedly contaminates this forum. 

budsfarm posted:

Your headlines says Children.

Your editorial says kids.

Exchange students were in the car with Taylor at the time of his arrest. They were at least 16 years old, meaning he won’t face child endangerment charges.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/l...s-wake-up-cal/nq8nP/

Just as a side note:  He was operating a vehicle under the influence, not a gun.

 

Why do you strain so hard in your apparent effort  to diminish the seriousness of his offense?  "Kids," as everyone--except maybe you?-- knows, is a synonym for "children. Your quibble on that score  has no argumentative merit within this issue. True, he did not endanger any kids/children under 16, but he most certainly DID endanger those exchange students 16 or over, plus his drunken self, plus other motorists he might well have harmed if he had not been stopped and prevented from continuing his reckless actions. Yes, he was indeed operating a vehicle while under the influence, and that is what he will have to answer to before the court, as well as the violation of the open container law.

The Georgia open carry  law could be improved with a provision adding a penalty for carrying a firearm while driving under the influence. Gun advocates would agree that a firearm user should exercise good judgment.   Judgment is imp;while drunk, and judgment-impaired drunks should not be going about armed. Wouldn't you agree?

 

Here is a link to the arrest report; scroll down to see the actual report form:

http://brookhavenpost.co/state...-arrested-dui/39518/

judgment-impaired drunks should not be going about armed. Wouldn't you agree?

Yes, I do.

However, you'd do well to research your articles thoroughly to find out the facts before posting.  The students involved were neither kids nor children. It is your sensationalism that takes away from the seriousness of the situation.

budsfarm posted:

judgment-impaired drunks should not be going about armed. Wouldn't you agree?

Yes, I do.

However, you'd do well to research your articles thoroughly to find out the facts before posting.  The students involved were neither kids nor children. It is your sensationalism that takes away from the seriousness of the situation.

_____

The article I cited was from a reputable news source.  I saw no obligation to survey the entire media sphere to be absolutely certain about all the facts.

At times, early reports don't have everything in apple pie order.  The Journal correctly reported the core facts. I do not consider it that  big a deal whether the persons in his car were 16 or over or under 16 years of age.  Whatever their ages, his irresponsible actions endangered them.  And reporting incorrect information (kids/children, etc.) on that fraction of the story  it does not constitute sensationalism on my part.

You should consider reading in depth rather than skimming, whatever the source.  Stands to reason that if the occupants had been kids/children, Taylor would have been charged for endangerment in addition to DUI, speeding, and open container.  In fact, child endangerment would led the list of the charges.  That fact clearly went right over your head. 

But it didn't mine.  I continued to research till I found the reason why.

I've told you numerous times before, the news/facts are not in the headlines.

budsfarm posted:

You should consider reading in depth rather than skimming, whatever the source.  Stands to reason that if the occupants had been kids/children, Taylor would have been charged for endangerment in addition to DUI, speeding, and open container.  In fact, child endangerment would led the list of the charges.  That fact clearly went right over your head. 

But it didn't mine.  I continued to research till I found the reason why.

I've told you numerous times before, the news/facts are not in the headlines.

Just one of many examples of Contendy posting false contents.  He's become a half azzed Woz.

Mr. Hooberbloob posted:
budsfarm posted:

You should consider reading in depth rather than skimming, whatever the source.  Stands to reason that if the occupants had been kids/children, Taylor would have been charged for endangerment in addition to DUI, speeding, and open container.  In fact, child endangerment would led the list of the charges.  That fact clearly went right over your head. 

But it didn't mine.  I continued to research till I found the reason why.

I've told you numerous times before, the news/facts are not in the headlines.

Just one of many examples of Contendy posting false contents.  He's become a half azzed Woz.

___

Absurd, Hoob. I posted content reported in an early article on this subject in a reputable newspaper.  You and others are quibbling about  details that are not 100% accurate but that changes little if anything about the meat of this story, which is the story of a drunken, reckless action by a legislator.  There is no such obligation as  budsfarm alleges, namely to perform an in-depth fact-checking search to verify or disprove every single element of a breaking news report.  What you conservatives are doing is obvious.  You are picking at a minor point to try to deflect the focus of the article, which in its essence is about the  irresponsible, drunken and dangerous behavior of a particular GOP politician currently running for re-election.

giftedamateur posted:

The  drunk Democrats have a job in politics for life, and are asked to run for president, even after killing someone while drunk. Contendahh, how is it that you can't admit how hypocritical you are?

_____

By your "reasoning" I should never post anything negative about any conservative's bad behavior without serving up some counterbalancing information concerning current or past misbehavior of one or more liberals.

Think about it.  That makes no sense.  And your demanding  prescription for some kind of "balance" is not followed by conservatives on this forum who often post items about bad behavior of liberals without including any condemnation of equally bad behavior by any conservative.

So I suggest that you really need to renovate your distorted notion of what constitutes hypocrisy! 

I do not owe you or anyone else any admission of hypocrisy because by any real standards, I have not committed hypocrisy simply by posting correct and current information concerning the documented bad behavior of a particular conservative miscreant!

Will Rogers once said, "I don't belong to an organized political party, I'm a democrat". My, haven't the parties changed. Just because the man was driving drunk, 72 in a 45 zone, armed and carrying 4 not adult people, he ain't bad like a democrat. I love it.

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