The system is broken, drugs and illegal drugs

We have a problem, putting these people in jail for using them is costing billions and billions of dollars and not helping any at all. We need special mental facilities to help these people. And for those that are selling them they need to be put into a special military camp and when they have completed the camp send then to Iraq for a few years.

Original Post
jtdavis posted:

$50,000 per year to lock drug addicts and users up is OK. $50 per year on drug education to try to keep the drug problem from happening is out of the question.

What's wrong with you? We spend thousands more than that keeping the "drug problem from happening" as you put it. It does no good. One problem, petting and pampering addicts, and paying for their drugs. Instead of just the dealers, they all need to be put in military camps, somewhere where they can't get to drugs.

What's wrong with you? We spend thousands more than that keeping the "drug problem from happening" as you put it. It does no good. One problem, petting and pampering addicts, and paying for their drugs. Instead of just the dealers, they all need to be put in military camps, somewhere where they can't get to drugs.

Where do you get your info from. 

jtdavis posted:

What's wrong with you? We spend thousands more than that keeping the "drug problem from happening" as you put it. It does no good. One problem, petting and pampering addicts, and paying for their drugs. Instead of just the dealers, they all need to be put in military camps, somewhere where they can't get to drugs.

Where do you get your info from. 

She probably gets it from the same place every one gets it. How do you not know this stuff? Do you live under a rock? We spend billions and still they love those drugs. As suggested, spend those billions putting the SOB away from the public.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Department of Health and Human Services: $4,751.1 million1
(Reflects $283.7 million increase from FY 2012)
The Nation’s substance abuse treatment providers treated an estimated 2.6 million clients
in specialty facilities in 2010. Substance abuse treatment most often is paid for by two or more public and private sources (private health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, state and local funds, and other Federal support). The Federal Government makes its largest contribution to the payment for treatment through the Medicaid and Medicare insurance programs. These programs are increasing in size and scope, with the expansion of populations and/or services covered.

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Programs of Regional and National Significance ‐ Treatment
Department of Health and Human Services ‐ SAMHSA: $364.1 million
(Reflects $61.1 million decrease from FY 2012)

The SAMHSA request includes a bundle of programs that are awarded directly to providers. These programs advance specific treatment methods, modalities, and services to targeted groups. Grants are awarded on a competitive basis to ensure the funding supports a particular identified need. These include:

  • $93.8 million (decreased $4.5 million from FY 2012 enacted) for Access to Recovery, which provides states funding for vouchers, coupled with state flexibility and executive discretion, to offer an opportunity to create positive change in substance abuse treatment and recovery service delivery across the Nation.
  • $30 million (decreased $21.1 million from FY 2012 enacted) for a Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment approach, which provides grants to health care providers to intervene early in the disease process before individuals achieve dependency, and can motivate the addicted client to engage in substance abuse treatment.
  • $65.1 million (decreased $2.4 million from FY 2012 enacted) for Criminal Justice Activities, including Treatment Drug Courts and Ex‐Offender Reentry program grants. Drug Courts help reduce recidivism and substance abuse among offenders and increase an offender’s likelihood of successful rehabilitation through early, continuous, and intense judicially supervised treatment, mandatory periodic drug testing, community supervision, and appropriate sanctions and other rehabilitation services. Ex‐Offender Reentry program grants provide screening, assessment, and comprehensive treatment and recovery support services to offenders reentering the community, as well as to offenders who are currently on or being released from probation or parole.
  • $41.6 million (no change from FY 2012 enacted) for Treatment Systems for the Homeless grants, which combine long‐term, community‐based housing assistance with intensive individualized treatment and recovery support services.
  • $52.5 million (decreased $13.5 million from FY 2012 enacted) for the Minority AIDS Initiative, which delivers and sustains high quality and accessible substance abuse and HIV prevention services.
  • $13.3 million (decreased $14.7 million from FY 2012 enacted) for Targeted Capacity Expansion (TCE) grants, which are designed to address gaps in treatment capacity by supporting rapid and strategic responses to demands for substance abuse (including alcohol and drug) treatment services in communities with serious, emerging drug problems, as well as communities with innovative solutions to unmet needs.
  • $57.0 million (decreased $0.9 million from FY 2012 enacted) for several other Treatment Capacity programs including: Opioid Treatment Programs and Regulatory Activities; Children and Family Programs; Pregnant and Post‐Partum Women; and the Recovery Community Services Program.

Substance Abuse Treatment Block Grant

Department of Health and Human Services ‐ SAMHSA: $1,448.6 billion
(Reflects a decrease of $7.4 million over FY 2012)

This formula‐based funding to states expands substance abuse treatment services, while providing maximum flexibility to states. States and territories may expend their funds only for the purpose of planning, carrying out, and evaluating activities related to these services. In FY 2013, the grant will continue to support the delivery of treatment while allowing states to access funding for prevention services.

Bureau of Prisons (BOP) Drug Treatment Efforts

Department of Justice: $109.3 million
(Reflects $15.8 million increase from FY 2012)

Approximately 40 percent of new inmates entering BOP custody have a diagnosis of a substance use disorder. Accordingly, BOP’s strategy of strong and comprehensive drug abuse treatment consists of screening and assessment; drug abuse education; non‐ residential drug abuse treatment services; residential drug abuse treatment programming; and community transitional drug abuse treatment. There is enormous demand for these services, in part because of the potential for some non‐violent offenders to earn a 1 year reduction in sentence following the successful completion of the program. Due to limited capacity, inmates eligible for the reduction receive an average reduction of about 8 months. Resources requested in this budget are vital to allow expansion of drug treatment capacity, and will help BOP reach the goal of providing 12 month sentence credits to all eligible inmates.

Problem Solving Justice

Department of Justice: $52.0 million
(Reflects $17.0 million increase from FY 2012 (drug court funding only))

In FY 2013, the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) requests $52.0 million to increase their support to problem solving courts and other strategies. OJP provides grants to criminal justice agencies to implement and improve drug court programs, as well as focus on mental health and other issues. The program focuses on the risks and needs of offenders through drug court programs and other problem‐solving approaches in an effort to decrease recidivism and improve public health and safety.

Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

Department of Justice: $21.0 million
(Reflects $11.0 million increase from FY 2012)

The Residential Substance Abuse Treatment program for state prisoners was established to help states and local governments develop, implement, and improve residential substance abuse treatment programs in correctional facilities, and establish and maintain community‐ based aftercare services for probationers and parolees. Ultimately, the program goal is to help offenders become drug‐free and learn the skills needed to sustain themselves upon return to the community. The Department of Justice will assist states and local jurisdictions to improve substance abuse‐related services for offenders and increase the number of offenders served.

The only way to stop the drugs is to stop the supply, that
would be crushing every country guilty of supplying the drugs. 
The problem is no one wants to stop a business employing
thousands of Americans in hundreds of different areas.
Crime pays...........  Complaining about it and making promises
is the flip side of the business, making the big bucks as well.
giftedamateur posted:

Jt, you're always so down on insurance companies, yet how many billions do they spend on dopers? I don't think they should have to pay a dime for them, but they do pay.

Obamacare requires that drug and alcohol treatment be included in policies.

direstraits posted:
giftedamateur posted:

Jt, you're always so down on insurance companies, yet how many billions do they spend on dopers? I don't think they should have to pay a dime for them, but they do pay.

Obamacare requires that drug and alcohol treatment be included in policies.

Insurance has paid for drug and alcohol rehab before Obamacare. Too, I don't think they should have to pay someone for injuries they got during the commission of a crime.

Never heard of US doctors prescribing heroin or meth. True, German doctors in WWII kept the entire army on meth, un der fuehrer, too.

Doctors are too eager to prescribe opiates to people for any degree of pain. A month later, they're hooked on them. To get off, suboxon (? spelling) is a common drug used. The suboxon treatment will wind up costing about $200 per month for consultation and about 6 to 12 dollars per suboxone patch. Heroin is cheaper. 

Most US doctors lose it just hearing the word "soma,"
they aren't the start of it jt.
jack, In the last 3 months, I had a tooth pulled and the dentist asked if i wanted something for pain. I asked "what is it"? reply, prescription tylenol. At the drug store i asked what is this. Answer, opiate with tylenol added. The other time was, I was in the hospital with pneumonia and the doctor wanted to give me an opiate for the lung pain. Thats how they feel about getting people hooked.

To Gifted, Best and Dire. I don't know if I had any rehab coverage or not. Drug use is one thing no one can put on me. For whatever reason I just didn't do drugs even though I've been around a lot of them. I know of 2 places in Alabama that are good rehab places, I know of several in Tennessee that are just there for the money. For a 30 day rehab program to work, it takes a strong individual that is really wanting to quit. The 2 that I think are good are 6 months or longer

jtdavis posted:

To Gifted, Best and Dire. I don't know if I had any rehab coverage or not. Drug use is one thing no one can put on me. For whatever reason I just didn't do drugs even though I've been around a lot of them. I know of 2 places in Alabama that are good rehab places, I know of several in Tennessee that are just there for the money. For a 30 day rehab program to work, it takes a strong individual that is really wanting to quit. The 2 that I think are good are 6 months or longer

Most healthcare policies used to have a two week drug/alcohol rehab limit.  Obamacare, by policy, must include a much longer term. One of the reasons the costs ran up.

jtdavis posted:
Most US doctors lose it just hearing the word "soma,"
they aren't the start of it jt.
jack, In the last 3 months, I had a tooth pulled and the dentist asked if i wanted something for pain. I asked "what is it"? reply, prescription tylenol. At the drug store i asked what is this. Answer, opiate with tylenol added. The other time was, I was in the hospital with pneumonia and the doctor wanted to give me an opiate for the lung pain. Thats how they feel about getting people hooked.
 Tylenol 3, and such a vicious animal it is, ooh the humanity.
Tylenol 4 still isn't a real threat.
jtdavis posted:

Jack, in my view and from watching others, an opiate is an opiate and not to be toyed with,

I took them after surgery, for a few days.  I stopped taking them because I got tired of sleeping all day, I had to work, and the pain was not so intense that I had to be in a zombie state.  30 day scrip and NO refills. No doctor ever offered me an unending supply. Now you want to make it doctors' fault that there are dopers out there that know how to get over? Plenty of doctors refuse to keep subscribing to them once they catch on to what the dope heads (who the slops support btw) are doing. More of that lefty BS of make it others' fault.

Add Reply

Likes (0)

×
×
×
×