Reply to "Why do people feel we are becoming a police state?"

The biggest problem is wading through all the hype and getting to the actual number of "innocents" killed by cops each year. I've been looking and the most I can find is 2,002 in a three year period. Again, out of millions of calls and arrests made each year. The problem, there's no clear story of whether or not they were actually "innocents". Many of the claims of their innocence comes from family or friends, and people seem anxious to take their word for it instead of the cops word. Then you have people killed by the criminals in situations, and people blaming the cops because of the circumstances of the confrontations. Zero is the number you would want in a perfect world. We don't live in a perfect world. Cops, criminals, guns, both cops and criminals guns, adrenaline, bystanders, all can add up to bad situations and very bad outcomes. A cop is expected to bend over backwards to avoid shooting someone, even to save their own life. Yet when a civilian, such as a woman who had plenty of options besides murder, guns a man down at a service station, too many think it's funny and what he had coming to him.

 

Now, consider this. 

 

 

The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) seminal study of preventable medical errors estimated as many as 98,000 people die every year at a cost of $29 billion. If the Centers for Disease Control were to include preventable medical errors as a category, these conclusions would make it the sixth leading cause of death in America.

Further research has confirmed the extent of medical errors. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) found that there were 181,000 severe injuries attributable to medical negligence in 2003. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement estimates there are 15 million incidents of medical harm each year. HealthGrades, the nation’s leading healthcare rating organization, found that Medicare patients who experienced a patient-safety incident had a one-in-five chance of dying as a result.

In the decade since the IOM first shined a light on the dismal state of patient safety in American hospitals, many proposals for improvement have been discussed and implemented. But recent research indicates that there is still much that needs to be done. Researchers at the Harvard School of Medicine have found that even today, about 18 percent of patients in hospitals are injured during the course of their care and that many of those injuries are life-threatening, or even fatal. The Office of the Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found that one in seven Medicare patients are injured during hospital stays and that adverse events during the course of care contribute to the deaths of 180,000 patients every year



Read more: http://freedomoutpost.com/2012...e-ama/#ixzz2b28QBydD

 

 

 

 

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