A Christian Plot for Domination?

With Tim Pawlenty out of the presidential race, it is now fairly clear that the GOP candidate will either be Mitt Romney or someone who makes George W. Bush look like Tom Paine. Of the three most plausible candidates for the Republican nomination, two are deeply associated with a theocratic strain of Christian fundamentalism known as Dominionism. If you want to understand Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry, understanding Dominionism isn’t optional. 

 

Put simply, Dominionism means that Christians have a God-given right to rule all earthly institutions. Originating among some of America’s most radical theocrats, it’s long had an influence on religious-right education and political organizing. But because it seems so outrÉ, getting ordinary people to take it seriously can be difficult. Most writers, myself included, who explore it have been called paranoid. In a contemptuous 2006 First Things review of several books, including Kevin Phillips’ American Theocracy, and my own Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism, conservative columnist Ross Douthat wrote, “the fear of theocracy has become a defining panic of the Bush era.”

Now, however, we have the most theocratic Republican field in American history, and suddenly, the concept of Dominionism is reaching mainstream audiences. Writing about Bachmann in The New Yorker this month, Ryan Lizza spent several paragraphs explaining how the premise fit into the Minnesota congresswoman’s intellectual and theological development. And a recent Texas Observer cover storyon Rick Perry examined his relationship with the New Apostolic Reformation, a Dominionist variant of Pentecostalism that coalesced about a decade ago. “[W]hat makes the New Apostolic Reformation movement so potent is its growing fascination with infiltrating politics and government,” wrote Forrest Wilder. Its members “believe Christians—certain Christians—are destined to not just take ‘dominion’ over government, but stealthily climb to the commanding heights of what they term the ‘Seven Mountains’ of society, including the media and the arts and entertainment world.”

 

Read more here:

Original Post

How did Bush try to establish a theocracy?

 

I don't recall any laws stating Christianity as a federal religion, never saw prayer established in schools, didn't see any flogging in the streets of any non-Christian followers.

 

 

A very strange corruption of what it is based on.

 

And God blessed [ Adam and Eve ] and God said unto them, "Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth." —Genesis 1:28 (KJV)

 

My interpretation of that verse from Gen is "learn what natural laws govern the planet and universe, and learn to use them to your benefit" 

>learn that wires crossing a magnetic field produce electricity -

> learn that a form of bread mold can kill harmful bacteria and make sick people well

> learn how reproduction works, and how it can be prevented (a bill to be voted on in Ms  in an upcoming election would disallow most birth control)

> in general , learn how things work and use them .

Originally Posted by b50m:

How did Bush try to establish a theocracy?

 

I don't recall any laws stating Christianity as a federal religion, never saw prayer established in schools, didn't see any flogging in the streets of any non-Christian followers.

 

 

A very strange corruption of what it is based on.

 

And God blessed [ Adam and Eve ] and God said unto them, "Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth." —Genesis 1:28 (KJV)

 

 

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Where did you read a claim that Bush tried to establish a theocracy?

 

He cited his religion quite regularly and he strengthened the support of Federal funds to faith-based organizations. Just to name a couple of things.  He was just barely left of Perry. But I don't think I read anywhere in that article where the writer claimed he tried to establish a theocracy.

 

Originally Posted by DarkAngel:
Originally Posted by b50m:

How did Bush try to establish a theocracy?

 

I don't recall any laws stating Christianity as a federal religion, never saw prayer established in schools, didn't see any flogging in the streets of any non-Christian followers.

 

 

A very strange corruption of what it is based on.

 

And God blessed [ Adam and Eve ] and God said unto them, "Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth." —Genesis 1:28 (KJV)

 

 

__________________________________________________

Where did you read a claim that Bush tried to establish a theocracy?

 

He cited his religion quite regularly and he strengthened the support of Federal funds to faith-based organizations. Just to name a couple of things.  He was just barely left of Perry. But I don't think I read anywhere in that article where the writer claimed he tried to establish a theocracy.

 

=============

Perry came out waving the religion flag because he thought people wanted

to see that, they didn't, they want a job. He might not be anymore religious

than you. I know he's not more religious than me.

I don't know why a firey chevy hasn't dragged my butt to the great dime

bag in the sky by now. Go figure.

.

And again, democrats can thump that bible right along with the best of them. Do I remember it right that the sunday before "monica gate" broke there was a pic of clinton coming out of church holding his bible? But I'm not going to argue the fact that there are indeed people that would love to establish a theocracy. But once again, perry and bachman are not my candidates.

Originally Posted by DarkAngel:

__________________________________________________

Where did you read a claim that Bush tried to establish a theocracy?

 

He cited his religion quite regularly and he strengthened the support of Federal funds to faith-based organizations. Just to name a couple of things.  He was just barely left of Perry. But I don't think I read anywhere in that article where the writer claimed he tried to establish a theocracy.

 

Right here:

conservative columnist Ross Douthat wrote, “the fear of theocracy has become a defining panic of the Bush era.”

Originally Posted by b50m:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel:

__________________________________________________

Where did you read a claim that Bush tried to establish a theocracy?

 

He cited his religion quite regularly and he strengthened the support of Federal funds to faith-based organizations. Just to name a couple of things.  He was just barely left of Perry. But I don't think I read anywhere in that article where the writer claimed he tried to establish a theocracy.

 

Right here:

conservative columnist Ross Douthat wrote, “the fear of theocracy has become a defining panic of the Bush era.”

__________________________________________

 

So when you read that statement you comprehend it saying that Bush tried to establish a theocracy?

 

Interesting....

Originally Posted by Bestworking:

And again, democrats can thump that bible right along with the best of them. Do I remember it right that the sunday before "monica gate" broke there was a pic of clinton coming out of church holding his bible? But I'm not going to argue the fact that there are indeed people that would love to establish a theocracy. But once again, perry and bachman are not my candidates.

 

 

Best, honestly I don't care what party this movement supported I would be against it. Just so happens I guess, they have found more support for their cause and agenda in the Republican candidates.

 

I'm sure there are many religious Democrats. I just have not seen a group like these 7 mountain Dominionist getting support, and giving support to any of the political leaders on the Dems side. Have you? I think this goes far beyond Clinton going to church and carrying a bible. 

DA it goes back to what I said, democrats are sneaky about it. They actually may use religion better by using the churches to advance their agenda, while attacking the religious right. Win win in their eyes. They can do it, and put someone else down for doing it too. Anyway, again, neither perry or bachman are my candidate.

Several weeks ago, I began posting on these forums concerning "Christian Dominionism" and the New Apostolic Reformation and its so-called "apostles," led by the absurdly theocratic nutjob, C. Peter Wagner, and based  significantly on the deranged doctrines of the tyrannical "Christian Reconstructionist, " Rousas John Rushdoony. "The Response," that Houston prayer and fasting affair that  featured Rick Perry was in very thick with these theocrats, with Wagner and numerous others of his strange persuasion being listed on The Response's website.

 

http://www.thedailybeast.com/a...-religious-bond.html

 

Perry and his supporters, along with others in the various conservative evangelical political camps,  downplay the influence of this movement so as to avoid having the GOP tainted with the stain of religious extremism.  As the primaries move froward, however, this dominionist nuttiness will come increasingly under the glare of public scrutiny and deserved exposure for what it is--a looming threat to the First Amendment's establishment clause.  Those who revere the Constitution should be appalled by this heretical, anti-American dominionist nonsense and should work to expose its infiltration into national politics. If he actually subscribes to this movement, then Perry should be rejected for doing so.  If he fails to understand how he has been and continues to be used by these "reformers," then he should be rejected as a gullible dupe! Either way, he is disqualified as a responsible candidate for the Presidency.

 

A good comprehensive discussion of this dominionist heresy is to be found at:

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/08/24/...in-spiritual-warfare

I have never accepted the fact that Bill Clinton is not still president.  Or is he?

No.

How sad.

I keep hoping.

God how I used to waste money when he was president.

I had three of everything.

Bill come baaaaaaack. Come back Billllllllllllllllll!!!!!!

Originally Posted by Contendah:

Several weeks ago, I began posting on these forums concerning "Christian Dominionism" and the New Apostolic Reformation and its so-called "apostles," led by the absurdly theocratic nutjob, C. Peter Wagner, and based  significantly on the deranged doctrines of the tyrannical "Christian Reconstructionist, " Rousas John Rushdoony. "The Response," that Houston prayer and fasting affair that  featured Rick Perry was in very thick with these theocrats, with Wagner and numerous others of his strange persuasion being listed on The Response's website.

 

http://www.thedailybeast.com/a...-religious-bond.html

 

Perry and his supporters, along with others in the various conservative evangelical political camps,  downplay the influence of this movement so as to avoid having the GOP tainted with the stain of religious extremism.  As the primaries move froward, however, this dominionist nuttiness will come increasingly under the glare of public scrutiny and deserved exposure for what it is--a looming threat to the First Amendment's establishment clause.  Those who revere the Constitution should be appalled by this heretical, anti-American dominionist nonsense and should work to expose its infiltration into national politics. If he actually subscribes to this movement, then Perry should be rejected for doing so.  If he fails to understand how he has been and continues to be used by these "reformers," then he should be rejected as a gullible dupe! Either way, he is disqualified as a responsible candidate for the Presidency.

 

A good comprehensive discussion of this dominionist heresy is to be found at:

 

http://www.npr.org/2011/08/24/...in-spiritual-warfare

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Contendah, I had heard a little here and there about this group, but I do credit you for really bringing them to my attention. Thanks.

 

These people are scary in more ways than one. Not only their message, but the fact that they are growing so fast and have some big money backing them.

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