In the aftermath of last week’s deadly school shooting in Florida, hundreds of teachers and administrators have expressed interest in carrying a firearm to defend themselves and their students, according to one county sheriff from Ohio.

Sheriff Richard Jones of Butler County, Ohio, published an open call on his Twitter page offering free concealed-carry classes to “any employee of any school” in his county. The sheriff, who last came under fire for his comments about immigrants, offered the class to 50 candidates, but then opened it up to more after what he described to Newsweek as a deluge of positive responses.

“We have reached our limit. We had to cut it off at 300,” he told Newsweek on Wednesday. “But the responses have been incredible." 

Jones, who was voted sheriff in 2004 and was a vocal supporter of President Donald Trump during the 2016 election, said he has long supported arming school faculty. He described it as a "last resort" and a "reality" that people need to face. The classes will start on Monday and run through the week, with potential weekend dates, as well. 

Original Post
antimaim posted:
Kraven posted:
Looks like Trump has the Florida teachers moving in the right
direction. His meeting with teachers, students and other members
of city officials and parents will prove to be effective. 

Just like Mrs. Cook.

I noticed you took this comment to another thread, but failed to address the issued in the thread you made about Mrs. Cook. Funny how that works.

Kraven posted:
Looks like Trump has the Florida teachers moving in the right
direction. His meeting with teachers, students and other members
of city officials and parents will prove to be effective. 

In the aftermath of last week’s deadly school shooting in Florida, hundreds of teachers and administrators have expressed interest in carrying a firearm to defend themselves and their students, according to one county sheriff from Ohio.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com...524de4b0617d4639e07c

Teachers are slamming President Donald Trump’s plan to bring more guns into schoolsby arming 20 percent of educators

“We need solutions that will keep guns out of the hands of those who want to use them to massacre innocent children and educators,” Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Association, told Education Week. “Arming teachers does nothing to prevent that.”

Many teachers have taken to social media to say they don’t want to carry guns, and more than a few pointed out that they were struggling to get funding for basic classroom supplies, much less firearms: 

https://www.huffingtonpost.com...0d48e4b0664343555886

In September 2014 at Idaho State University, a teacher accidentally shot himself in the foot when his concealed handgun discharged. Students in the chemistry class watched.

Later that month at a Utah elementary school, a teacher carrying a concealed weapon accidentally shot herself in the leg as she used the restroom

In 2016, a group of elementary school students in Pennsylvania found a loaded gun in the bathroom after a teacher accidentally left it behind. 

In all these cases, it’s lucky no child got hurt.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump doubled down on his suggestion that schools arm teachers with weapons to counteract armed intruders, such as the one who killed 17 people last week in Parkland, Florida. Trump went so far as to say that those who received training to use firearms could be eligible for extra pay.

But you don’t have to look far to see that this policy could have devastating, albeit unintended, consequences. 

Law enforcement groups and teacher organizations have expressed opposition to the president’s firearm proposal.

 

Mo Canady, the executive director of the National Association for School Resource Officers ― the group that trains and represents school cops ― warned that law enforcement officers responding to an incident might mistake an teacher with a firearm for an assailant.

He also expressed skepticism about how an armed teacher would respond to a school shooting attack.

“Anyone who hasn’t received the extensive training provided to law enforcement officers will likely be mentally unprepared to take a life, especially the life of a student assailant,” Canady said in a statement. 

A number of states allow teachers to carry weapons on college and K-12 campuses under certain circumstances. In a few scattered school districts throughout the country, teachers are systematically armed. 

It’s an idea that both of the nation’s teacher unions strongly oppose. 

“Bringing more guns into our schools does nothing to protect our students and educators from gun violence,” Lily Eskelsen García, president of the National Education Association that represents three million educators, said in a statement. “Our students need more books, art and music programs, nurses and school counselors; they do not need more guns in their classrooms.”

Bill Bond spent years studying school safety with the National Association for Secondary School Principals. Bond, now retired, was the principal of Kentucky’s Heath High School in 1997 when a student shot and killed three classmates. He doesn’t pretend to have found the answer on school safety ― after 20 years of studying the issue, he said there’s no easy fix.

But he does know that teachers shouldn’t be armed with weapons. He said he worries that more children would die from accidental shootings if teachers were armed than from school shootings. 

“I’m coming at that from a standpoint of a person that’s been in a school shooting. I have taken the gun from a guy that had just killed three kids, and also the perspective of a person whose been around guns all their life,” Bond said. “If you’re in a school shooting, it’s a situation of instant decisions. I had 3 kids killed in 12 seconds. Thats how fast it happens.” 

(CNN)The school shooting was over in seconds. But it could have dragged on longer and proven deadlier were it not for the rapid response of a school resource officer. When a 17-year-old gunman walked into Maryland's Great Mills High School on Tuesday, the swift action of the school's sole resource officer, Blaine Gaskill, was instrumental in bringing the incident to a quick end. Gaskill's response was hailed as an example of exactly what a resource officer is supposed to do in such a circumstance, particularly when contrasted to the actions of the security officer in last month's shooting in Parkland, Florida. (In the incident at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on February 14, the armed school resource deputy waited outside the school building as the shooter gunned down students inside.) "He responded exactly how we train our personnel to respond," St. Mary's County Sheriff Tim Cameron told reporters. 

Deputy Blaine Gaskill [left), seen here in a photo taken in 2012 and posted on the St. Mary's County Sheriff's Office Facebook page.
 

Engaging the shooter

As soon as the gunfire began, Gaskill rushed to the scene. He fired a round at the shooter, who also fired a round at the same time, Cameron said.
It's not yet clear whether the shooter, Austin Wyatt Rollins, was felled by the officer's bullet or killed himself.
"DFC [Deputy First Class] Gaskill fired at the shooter ... almost simultaneously as the shooter fired," Cameron said. "This is something we train, practice and in reality, hope would never come to fruition. This is our worst nightmare."
Gov. Larry Hogan called Gaskill "a very capable school resource officer who also happened to be a SWAT team member."
"This is a tough guy who apparently closed in very quickly and took the right kind of action," he said. "And while I think it's still tragic, he may have saved other people's lives."

Over in seconds

The incident began in a school hallway at 7:55 a.m., just before classes started. Authorities say Austin, armed with a handgun, shot a female student, with whom he had a prior relationship, and another male student.
Gaskill responded to the scene in less than a minute, the sheriff said.
Cameron said the entire incident took less than a minute, possibly seconds.
The 16-year-old female student is in critical condition with life-threatening injuries, and the 14-year-old male student who was shot is in stable condition.
Gaskill was unharmed.
"He's doing well and we're going to do everything to support and promote him and his well-being," Cameron said.

Playing to a narrative

Gaskill's actions were praised, rightly, across social media. But some -- most notably, the NRA -- held him up as an example of the "good guy with a gun" theory. The theory goes, that bad guys will always find a way to circumvent whatever gun laws are in place. And "to stop a bad guy with a gun," as NRA head Wayne Lapierre said, "it takes a good guy with a gun."
"This [Great Mills High School] armed school resource officer, you're not hearing anyone in #MSM talk about it because it disrupts their narrative," NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch said in one of several tweets Tuesday. (MSM is short for mainstream media.)
So far, this year, there have already been 17 school shootings where someone was hurt or killed.
 
In the Parkland shooting, school resource deputy Scot Peterson never entered the building after taking a position outside. He resigned after he was suspended without pay for his inaction.
"Had our resource officer taken action immediately, the result of the Stoneman Douglas Valentine's Day Massacre would have been different," Parkland student Kai Koerber told CNN.
"We might not have had to walk over the bodies of our classmates, once lovely and wonderful people, as we were led away from murderous tragedy." 
Speaking to reporters, Dr. James Scott Smith, the superintendent of St. Mary's County's public schools, put the senselessness of it all in perspective.
"It looks as though the SRO [school resource officer] did exactly what the SRO is trained to do, and yet we still have a tragic loss of life," he said. "We still have somebody in critical condition. And we have students at the school and staff at the school impacted."
If this is what it takes, it's better than injured students and other
 personnel. No one is advocating for mandatory armed teachers
in schools the way the Alinsky people want you to believe would
happen. Just armed volunteers/professionals and retired military
with a complete background check. If there would be a teacher
that could qualify with an acceptable background all well and good.
It wouldn't take a large budget working it like this.
Kraven posted:
If this is what it takes, it's better than injured students and other
 personnel. No one is advocating for mandatory armed teachers
in schools the way the Alinsky people want you to believe would
happen. Just armed volunteers/professionals and retired military
with a complete background check. If there would be a teacher
that could qualify with an acceptable background all well and good.
It wouldn't take a large budget working it like this.

Where are the fathers?  These punks don't have anyone to teach them how to conduct themselves?  

Naio posted:
Kraven posted:If this is what it takes, it's better than injured students and other personnel. No one is advocating for mandatory armed teachersin schools the way the Alinsky people want you to believe wouldhappen. Just armed volunteers/professionals and retired militarywith a complete background check. If there would be a teacherthat could qualify with an acceptable background all well and good.It wouldn't take a large budget working it like this.

Where are the fathers?  These punks don't have anyone to teach them how to conduct themselves?  

What makes anyone think the punk daddies are capable of teaching
conduct to anyone.

What does your question have to do with my post??

For the record I don't care where the so called fathers might be
or who teaches the punks, that ship sailed years ago. 

 "Authorities say Austin, armed with a handgun, shot a female student, with whom he had a prior relationship, and another male student."

Maybe, he thought a gun was the only solution to his problems because no one taught him a better way.  So...now we need more guns in schools because that's the only solution.

If that ship has sailed, then the adults need to have a seat.  Let this new generation of teenagers handle it.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
Post

×
×
×
×