The fires have spread to about 250 acres of the contaminated forest surrounding the former power plant in Ukraine

A forest fire in the contaminated forest surrounding the Chernobyl power plant

Forest fires near the site of the world’s worst nuclear accident in Chernobyl have seen radiation spike to 16 times its normal levels.

Yegor Firsov, head of Ukraine’s state ecological inspection service, shared a video on Facebook on Sunday of a Geiger counter showing how the radiation at the centre of the fires is far higher than normal.

He explained: “There is bad news – radiation is above normal in the fire’s centre.”

Yegor went on to explain that the fires had spread to about 100 hectares (250 acres) of forest.

They broke out on Saturday and the Ukrainian capital of Kiev has already mobilised two planes, a helicopter and around 100 firefighters to fight the blaze.

But the high radiation levels at its core has led to some difficulties in battling the fires.

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Smoke can be seen filling the sky behind the line of trees.

Radiation levels in the Ukrainian capital, though, were within normal levels, according to emergency services.

The explosion of the fourth reactor at the Chernobyl power plant officially killed just 31 people at the time, according to the then-Soviet Union.

But, given the nature of secrecy within the Bloc, world experts believe the figure may be far greater.

 

The exclusion zone is largely unpopulated, although about 200 people have remained despite orders to leave.

It is not uncommon for fires to break out in the radioactive forest surrounding the former power plant.

Chernobyl nuclear power plant a few weeks after the disaster

Chernobyl nuclear power plant a few weeks after the disaster

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/ne...cket-forest-21822050

It's All Over Now, Take What You Think Is Necessary

Original Post

This has always been 'the worst fear' of people knowledgeable about Chernobyl. Everything for miles, in all directions, around the power plant is radioactive: the trees, plants, dirt, insects, animals (deer herds, wild pigs, birds, fish)...you name it. It's ALL radioactive.

A forest fire could send TONS of highly radioactive ash into the atmosphere where it would spiral in a counterclockwise direction, covering first eastern Europe, then Scandinavia and Great Britain before plunging south towards France and the Mediterranean region. 

Also there's that Russian nuclear sub scrapped in north Atlantic ocean
polluting with radioactivity for the last 30 years or so.
Jack Hammer posted:
Also there's that Russian nuclear sub scrapped in north Atlantic ocean
polluting with radioactivity for the last 30 years or so.

IIRC, that would be the K19.

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