One of the biggest stories in Alabama politics...if not the biggest...and it was ignored. I saw Doug Jones give his approval of an ad that was an out and out lie about Moore...and I am convinced he knew about this "Russian Invasion" into Alabama politics too. He still barely won and he should have resigned immediately when he was "informed" of the illegal actions.

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“Russian invasion? Roy Moore sees spike in Twitter followers from land of Putin,” read the headline of an article at The Montgomery Advertiser, just months before the election night. Other outlets shortly picked up the story.

“Russian invasion? Roy Moore sees spike in Twitter followers from land of Putin,” read the headline of an article at The Montgomery Advertiser, just months before the election night. Other outlets shortly picked up the story.

 

Democratic operatives, backed by a liberal billionaire and facilitated by a former Obama official, created thousands of fake Russian accounts to give an impression the Russian government was supporting Alabama Republican Roy Moore in last year’s election against now-Sen. Doug Jones.

The secret project, which had a budget of just $100,000 and was carried out on Facebook and Twitter, was revealed after the New York Times obtained an internal report detailing the efforts.

“We orchestrated an elaborate ‘false flag’ operation that planted the idea that the Moore campaign was amplified on social media by a Russian botnet,” the internal report said. It also took credit for “radicalizing Democrats with a Russian bot scandal” after experimenting “with many of the tactics now understood to have influenced the 2016 elections.”

Jones said Thursday he is "outraged" over the report and wants a federal investigation over the project.

"I'd like to see the Federal Election Commission and the Justice Department look at this to see if there were any laws being violated and, if there were, prosecute those responsible," he said. "These authorities need to use this example right now to start setting the course for the future to let people know that this is not acceptable in the United States of America."

"We orchestrated an elaborate ‘false flag’ operation that planted the idea that the Moore campaign was amplified on social media by a Russian botnet."

— Internal report

One participant in the project reportedly was Jonathon Morgan, the chief executive of New Knowledge, a firm that wrote a report – released by the Senate Intelligence Committee earlier this week – about Russia’s social media operations in the 2016 election and its efforts to hurt Hillary Clinton and help Donald Trump.

He reportedly contacted Renée DiResta, who later joined his company and became the leading author of the report about the Russian interference efforts for the firm, asking for suggestions of online tactics that are worth testing.

In a statement on Twitter, he denied the project was aimed at influencing the election, which the Democrat won by 22,000 votes. "I did not participate in any campaign to influence the public," he wrote, saying the project goals weren't about supporting the Jones campaign.

The Senate Intelligence Committee did not respond to a request for comment.

The Alabama project was funded by liberal billionaire and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman who gave $100,000 to the cause, according to the Times. Hoffman is one of Silicon Valley’s top donors to the Democrats, donating $7 million to various groups and campaigns in the last election cycle.

The money trickled down through American Engagement Technologies, a firm run by Mikey ****erson who was appointed by former President Barack Obama to lead the newly-created United States Digital Service.

****erson did not reply to Fox News’ immediate request for a comment.

The money trickled down through American Engagement Technologies, a firm run by Mikey ****erson who was appointed by former President Barack Obama to lead the newly-created United States Digital Service.

The money trickled down through American Engagement Technologies, a firm run by Mikey ****erson who was appointed by former President Barack Obama to lead the newly-created United States Digital Service. (YouTube/)

The Democratic operatives then created a Facebook page and imitated conservative Alabamians who weren’t satisfied with the Republican candidate while encouraging others to write in another candidate.

The project also involved creating thousands of fake Russian accounts on Twitter that began following Moore. This effort attracted attention from local and national media, falsely suggesting Russia is backing Moore’s candidacy.

“Russian invasion? Roy Moore sees spike in Twitter followers from land of Putin,” read the headline of an article at The Montgomery Advertiser, just months before the election night. Other outlets shortly picked up the story.

 

The Washington Post, meanwhile, pointed out that the Moore campaign accused the Jones campaign and Democratic operatives of “pulling a political stunt on Twitter and alerting their friends in the media.

"This is the first time I’ve ever seen a liberal get mad about chopping up a baby."

 

Hoyt Deau Hutchinson

Original Post

That's a problem with facebook

Look who called it out...

https://www.vox.com/policy-and...imony-green-new-deal

If Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez or any other Democrat wants to run an ad on Facebook saying a Republican lawmaker supports the Green New Deal, there’s nothing Mark Zuckerberg is going to do about it. Well, probably.

On Wednesday, Zuckerberg appeared in a hearing before the House Financial Services Committee that was supposed to be about Facebook’s Libra crypto project but that wound up being about pretty much any Facebook-related issue under the sun. Members of Congress grilled the executive on the litany of controversies and questions the social media giant is facing, including hate speech, data privacy, diversity, content moderation, and more. Top of mind for some in Congress — not to mention the public — is Facebook’s policy that allows politicians to lie in their political ads. And Ocasio-Cortez, the first-term Democrat from New York, drilled down on the matter.

“You announced recently that the official policy of Facebook now allows politicians to pay to spread disinformation in 2020 elections and in the future. So I just want to know how far I can push this in the next year,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

She asked whether she could pay to target predominantly black zip codes and advertise the wrong election date, to which Zuckerberg replied that such an ad would be barred. “If anyone, including a politician, is saying things that can cause ... that is calling for violence, or could risk imminent physical harm, or voter or census suppression, when we roll out the census suppression policy, we will take that content down,” he said.

“So there is some threshold where you will fact-check political advertisements. Is that what you’re telling me?” Ocasio-Cortez said.

Zuckerberg’s point makes sense — providing a wrong date for an election is one fairly clear voter suppression tactic.

But then she followed up with a different scenario: What about ads targeting Republicans in primaries saying that they had voted for the Green New Deal, which she has championed? Zuckerberg asked her to repeat the question. Here’s the exchange that followed:

Ocasio-Cortez: Would I be able to run advertisements on Facebook targeting Republicans in primaries saying that they voted for the Green New Deal? I mean, if you’re not fact-checking political advertisements, I’m just trying to understand the bounds here, what’s fair game.

Zuckerberg: Congresswoman, I don’t know the answer to that off the top of my head, I think probably.

Ocasio-Cortez: You don’t know if I’ll be able to do that.

Zuckerberg: I think probably.

Ocasio-Cortez: Do you see a potential problem here with a complete lack of fact-checking on political advertisements?

Zuckerberg: Well, Congresswoman, I think lying is bad, and I think if you were to run an ad that had a lie in it, that would be bad. That’s different from it being ... in our position, the right thing to do to prevent your constituents or people in an election from seeing that you had lied.

She continued to press him to say whether Facebook would take down political ads containing flat-out lies. “In most cases, in a democracy, I believe that people should be able to see for themselves what politicians that they may or may not vote for are saying and judge their character for themselves,” Zuckerberg said.

The controversy over Facebook’s political ads policy isn’t going away

Facebook’s political ads policies have come under heavy scrutiny in recent weeks.

Much of the dustup was ignited when President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign was allowed to run an ad on Facebook — and multiple other platforms — making false claims about former Vice President Joe Biden. It’s all snowballed from there. Many politicians, members of the media, and others have roundly criticized Facebook and other social media platforms for refusing to take down fake political ads. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), who has targeted Facebook in her 2020 presidential bid, went as far as to take out a fake ad on Facebook to highlight the implications of its policies.

Facebook and Zuckerberg, however, have stuck with their approach to political advertising despite the pushback. Last week, Zuckerberg delivered a speech at Georgetown University that attempted to defend the company and his worldview on speech. “While I certainly worry about an erosion of truth, I don’t think most people want to live in a world where you can only post things that tech companies judged to be 100 percent true,” he said. “Banning political ads favors incumbents and whoever the media chooses to cover.”

And on a call with reporters earlier this week, Zuckerberg fielded questions from reporters about the matter as well and sang a similar tune. “I just think that in a democracy people should be able to see for themselves what politicians are saying, and I think that people should make up their own minds about which candidates are credible and which candidates have the kind of character that they want to see in their elected officials,” he said. “And I don’t think those determinations should come from tech companies.”

Facebook doesn’t need to run political ads; they’re not a significant portion of its business. But the company appears determined to leave its policy unchanged. So prepare for some your-Republican-Congressman-supports-the-Green-New-Deal ads from Democrats in 2020. Maybe.

Jack Hammer posted:
I don't see the people liking Jeff that much, they need someone to run
against Jeff to beat Jones.

I don't think that will take much. He barely beat Moore...and now that it has come out that the little troll Jones had dem operatives pulling the Russian hoax to interfere in the election...I think he is gone. He should have resigned when all that came out.

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