By S Brinkmann (Women of Grace)

FP writes: “A number of years ago a book was recommended to us by a physical therapist which I bought, but have been hesitant to read.  It is titled, Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zinn, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, published by Delta. The index presents mostly okay topics, but does have about 20 pp. favoring yoga . . . .  Mentioned in the book are these persons’ names: Thich Nhat Hanh, Joan Borysenko, Phil Kapleu, amongst many others. The word mindfulness is mentioned many times. I’m just not sure about this book.  Have you ever heard of it?”


You should definitely pass on the work of Kabat-Zin. Although he is distinguished in the field of medicine, he was also a student of Zen Master Seung Sahn and has integrated the practice of yoga and his
Studies of Buddhism into what he calls
  “Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction”
or MBSR. This is an 8-week course combining meditation and Hatha yoga to help patients cope with stress, pain, and illness through moment-to-moment awareness. Mindfulness meditation is based in Buddhist meditation and is very similar to transcendental meditation in that it is practiced for about 20 minutes twice a day and relies on certain postures, breathing techniques and concentration to effect an altered state of consciousness.

This blog goes into more detail about what is wrong with Mindfulness Meditation from a Catholic perspective.

This would explain why he references Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk, in the book you mention. Another person he references, Phil Kapleu, is a teacher of Zen Buddhism. Dr. Joan Borysenko is a highly educated woman with a doctorate in Medical Sciences from Harvard Medical School who describes herself as a “distinguished pioneer in integrative medicine” and “world-renowned expert in mind/body connection.” Her New Age leanings are quite evident in just the title of one of her books: Your Sacred Quest: Finding Your Way to the Divine Within.

This is a perfect example of how health care professionals who dabble in alternative therapies introduce the unsuspecting into religious practices that are incompatible with Christianity. Even though they may not be teaching Buddhism per se, they are certainly creating an appetite in their patients for a form of meditation that is not even remotely similar to the Christian concept of prayer – which is a dialogue with God. Eastern techniques such as MBSR are mental exercises designed to bring one into an altered state of consciousness.

In fairness, your physical therapist should have told you that Kabat-Zinn’s work is based in Buddhism (assuming that he/she knew this) rather than leaving you to figure out on your own that this is probably not something you ought to read. If this therapist is into Kabat-Zinn, I can just image what else he/she might offer you. Besides pitching that book, you might want to find another therapist and stick to good old-fashioned prayer to the greatest healer Who ever walked the earth – our Lord Jesus Christ.

consider this warning Paul gave: "See then the kindness and the severity of God: severity toward those who have fallen, but God’s kindness to you, provided you continue in his kindness; otherwise you too will be cut off" (Rom. 11:22)

Original Post

HoD says, " I can just image what else he/she might offer you. Besides pitching that book, you might want to find another therapist and stick to good old-fashioned prayer to the greatest healer Who ever walked the earth – our Lord Jesus Christ."


And here is our daily dose of stupid (as if there were a shortage here).  Meditation absolutely, positively does work to ease stress and even relieve pain - especially when combined with Yogo or any other exercise.  Meditation works on the self the same way prayer works: by focusing your mind on a problem and dealing with it  either directly or indirectly.

Neither prayer or meditation have any effect on the outside world whatsoever.  There is simply no possible way in this reality that sending invisible mind beams through the ether can possibly have an effect on another.  

Originally Posted by House of David:
By S Brinkmann (Women of Grace)

FP writes: “A number of years ago a book was recommended to us by a physical therapist which I bought, but have been hesitant to read.  It is titled, Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zinn, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, published by Delta. The index presents mostly okay topics, but does have about 20 pp. favoring yoga . . . .  Mentioned in the book are these persons’ names: Thich Nhat Hanh, Joan Borysenko, Phil Kapleu, amongst many others. The word mindfulness is mentioned many times. I’m just not sure about this book.  Have you ever heard of it?”


You should definitely pass on the work of Kabat-Zin. Although he is distinguished in the field of medicine, he was also a student of Zen Master Seung Sahn and has integrated the practice of yoga and his
Studies of Buddhism into what he calls
  “Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction”
or MBSR. This is an 8-week course combining meditation and Hatha yoga to help patients cope with stress, pain, and illness through moment-to-moment awareness. Mindfulness meditation is based in Buddhist meditation and is very similar to transcendental meditation in that it is practiced for about 20 minutes twice a day and relies on certain postures, breathing techniques and concentration to effect an altered state of consciousness.

This blog goes into more detail about what is wrong with Mindfulness Meditation from a Catholic perspective.

This would explain why he references Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk, in the book you mention. Another person he references, Phil Kapleu, is a teacher of Zen Buddhism. Dr. Joan Borysenko is a highly educated woman with a doctorate in Medical Sciences from Harvard Medical School who describes herself as a “distinguished pioneer in integrative medicine” and “world-renowned expert in mind/body connection.” Her New Age leanings are quite evident in just the title of one of her books: Your Sacred Quest: Finding Your Way to the Divine Within.

This is a perfect example of how health care professionals who dabble in alternative therapies introduce the unsuspecting into religious practices that are incompatible with Christianity. Even though they may not be teaching Buddhism per se, they are certainly creating an appetite in their patients for a form of meditation that is not even remotely similar to the Christian concept of prayer – which is a dialogue with God. Eastern techniques such as MBSR are mental exercises designed to bring one into an altered state of consciousness.

In fairness, your physical therapist should have told you that Kabat-Zinn’s work is based in Buddhism (assuming that he/she knew this) rather than leaving you to figure out on your own that this is probably not something you ought to read. If this therapist is into Kabat-Zinn, I can just image what else he/she might offer you. Besides pitching that book, you might want to find another therapist and stick to good old-fashioned prayer to the greatest healer Who ever walked the earth – our Lord Jesus Christ.

This post is a perfect example of someone who doesn't know what he is talking about. Mindfulness can help anyone, regardless of their religion or lack of religion.

Buddhism is perfectly compatible with Christianity contrary to belief.

 

Worship in Buddhism is showing respect to your teacher, and in the case of Buddha he is definitely NOT a god but a normal man. Siddhartha was around 500 years before the coming of Jesus, so of course he never mentioned him, nor did he say anything else about other gods or the belief in them, it was all about stopping suffering and living peacefully.  Believe that there is or isn't a God it's no different to them.

 

For that matter, have your pastor never talked about clearing your mind to listen to what Jesus is trying to tell you?  That's meditation.

Hi David,

 

You ask, "Do Christians Need Buddhist Meditation Techniques . . .?"

 

Simple answer:  NO!  In no way!

 

Ryokurin tells us, "Buddhism is perfectly compatible with Christianity contrary to belief."

 

Totally and completely untrue.  Buddhism is the antithesis of Christianity.  Buddhist are closer to atheists than to Christians -- for most Buddhist do not believe in the existence of God.  Virtually everything about Buddhism is the opposite of Christianity.

 

My suggestion:  If anyone needs a meditation technique -- get your Bible, find a quiet place to sit, and study what God has written there.  If one is not a believer and needs help in understanding the Bible; find a Christian Friend and ask for his/her help in a one-on-one study.   This, I assure you, will be much more productive that any Eastern Meditation Technique.

 

God bless, have a wonderful, blessed day,

 

Bill

Originally Posted by Bill Gray:

Virtually everything about Buddhism is the opposite of Christianity.

That's certainly been my experience. I've never encountered a Buddhist who thought it was appropriate to go to war with another country for having a different religion, or who thought it was appropriate to stop a community from building a house of worship because their religion was different. Most of the Buddhists I've ever encountered have focused on wisdom and compassion for their spiritual belief, rather than world domination.

I guess when you think about it it's no wonder they'd be against meditation. That is unless it's what bill suggested, meditating with the bible. They can't take a chance that a "believer" might have a rational thought slip in. Before I saw this forum I would have laughed if someone had told me all the things certain christians are against. Now this?  I guess we can all stay tuned to see what hits their "no no" list next. Daydreaming maybe? Wishful thinking?

Originally Posted by Bestworking:

I guess when you think about it it's no wonder they'd be against meditation. That is unless it's what bill suggested, meditating with the bible. They can't take a chance that a "believer" might have a rational thought slip in. Before I saw this forum I would have laughed if someone had told me all the things certain christians are against. Now this?  I guess we can all stay tuned to see what hits their "no no" list next. Daydreaming maybe? Wishful thinking?

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Best, I haven't read much of this thread nor will I, but I meditate, daydream

and do a great deal of planning and wishful thinking. All sane people do.

Many people who say they are believers aren't Christian.

.

Originally Posted by Bill Gray:
My suggestion:  If anyone needs a meditation technique -- get your Bible, find a quiet place to sit, and study what God has written there.
----------

Ahh yes.  I admit, as a teenager, I found the following to be quite, er, umm, relaxing.  I recall looking for that UFO story in Ezekiel (I was a big UFO not back then) but ran across this story relayed to Ezekiel by the Lord God Himself (before he became Jesus, of course). 
"11 “Her sister Oholibah saw this, yet in her lust and prostitution she was more depraved than her sister. 12 She too lusted after the Assyrians—governors and commanders, warriors in full dress, mounted horsemen, all handsome young men. 13I saw that she too defiled herself; both of them went the same way.

 14 “But she carried her prostitution still further. She saw men portrayed on a wall, figures of Chaldeans[a] portrayed in red, 15 with belts around their waists and flowing turbans on their heads; all of them looked like Babylonian chariot officers, natives of Chaldea.[b] 16 As soon as she saw them, she lusted after them and sent messengers to them in Chaldea. 17 Then the Babylonians came to her, to the bed of love, and in their lust they defiled her. After she had been defiled by them, she turned away from them in disgust. 18 When she carried on her prostitution openly and exposed her naked body, I turned away from her in disgust, just as I had turned away from her sister. 19 Yet she became more and more promiscuous as she recalled the days of her youth, when she was a prostitute in Egypt. 20 There she lusted after her lovers, whose genitals were like those of donkeys and whose emission was like that of horses.

 

----
Quite impressive, no?  The whole chapter reads like a modern day "romance" novel.  Not quite as beautiful as the Song of Solomon but, man, the sex is raunchy, ain't it?  http://www.biblegateway.com/pa...l+23&version=NIV

 

 

Whoda thnk the Lord was such a sex machine?

 

Read the whole scandalous story here: http://www.biblegateway.com/pa...l+23&version=NIV

It's called allegory, Unob. If you need help figuring it out, there are plenty of online resources.

 

But you see, it's when you post something like this that we wonder how you could have REALLY been a Christian back in the day. If you can't understand this, that is an indication that you never really understood ANY of it. If you didn't understand it, how could you have been a Christian?

Originally Posted by O No!:

It's called allegory, Unob. If you need help figuring it out, there are plenty of online resources.

----

 

I made no comment on the literalness of the story.  It was an illustration the stupidity of Bill suggestion to read the bible when one needs some comfort. It's a horrible story full of tales of death, degenerate sex and animistic comparisons.  It's just sick no matter if it's allegory, metaphor or the literal Word of Yahweh.  And the bible is filled with such horrible crap.

Originally Posted by Unobtanium:
Originally Posted by O No!:

It's called allegory, Unob. If you need help figuring it out, there are plenty of online resources.

----

 

I made no comment on the literalness of the story.  It was an illustration the stupidity of Bill suggestion to read the bible when one needs some comfort. It's a horrible story full of tales of death, degenerate sex and animistic comparisons.  It's just sick no matter if it's allegory, metaphor or the literal Word of Yahweh.  And the bible is filled with such horrible crap.

________________________________________________________________________

In your OPINION.

 

So, don't read it.

 

Originally Posted by INVICTUS:
Many people who say they are believers aren't Christian.

Agreed. And in my experience, many people who say they are Christian aren't believers, or certainly don't act like them.

 

“I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.” — Mahatma Gandhi

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