quote:
Originally posted by Mr.Dittohead:
The FY 2012 decrease is all from the overseas operation in Iraq due too the change in mission. To date, the expenditures in Iraq and Astan have topped $850billion, not including the ongoing health care cost for veterans and their dependents.

http://comptroller.defense.gov...st_Overview_Book.pdf


Sorry, no! About $16 billion was from cancellation of nearly 600 Marine amphibious armored vehicles. Reducing about 2,2000 high level positions in the Pentagon was another. Personnel reductions in government don't yield big savings, canceling the programs they administer is the key.

Veteran costs will reduce, even as new veterans come into the system. The present infrastructure was designed to support the millions from WWII. They are leaving us, sadly, at about 800 per day.
quote:
Originally posted by Mr.Dittohead:
Here is the link again:
http://comptroller.defense.gov...st_Overview_Book.pdf

Go to page 6-1. Read. Learn.


I understand that those unfamiliar with DoD budgeting might have trouble interpreting data. Page 6-1 shows troop changes and a re-programming of funds, not a reduction.

See Page 4-2 for the EFV, amphibious armored vehicle I spoke of. A reduction of $12 billion is stated with a halt to that program. With associated items, about $16 billion is the actual amount.

The referenced document is a bit dated.

"Defense Secretary Robert Gates has outlined plans for slashing more than 200 senior civilian executive positions across the department.

Affected positions include 176 civilian senior executive positions — 97 members of the Senior Executive Service, 21 senior-level and scientific professionals, five Defense intelligence senior executives and 53 Defense intelligence senior level positions — and 33 highly qualified experts, according to Gates' memo to department leaders, sent Monday.

The Army, Navy and Air Force combined will lose 54 SES positions.

Gates instructed Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Clifford Stanley to eliminate the positions in the next two years, possibly through the use of reductions in force, voluntary early retirements or buyouts.

"Every effort will be made to retain key talent in the Department and minimize impact to personnel and the mission," he said in the memo.

The secretary called for stricter policies on the hiring and accounting of retired senior officers to advise the military. Once called senior mentors, these advisers will now be highly qualified experts (HQEs), which is a special category of temporary employees who possess unique expertise and occupy senior positions. Gates said the department must lower drastically the maximum number of HQEs it allows itself to employ, from 2,500 down to 350 or less.

"I think that's a pretty substantial cut," Carol Bonosaro, president of Senior Executives Association, which represents the government's top managers, said of the civilian cuts. "Maybe I would have expected about 100 at most."

More at:

http://www.federaltimes.com/ar...306/1018/DEPARTMENTS

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