Contendah, Beternun, and all your other identities, why must you continue to change your identity? Others on here have either did it to side step their banning from TVT. Others such as best working either got bored or wanted to freshen up their name. But as for Beternun you will allways be better than none. You try to escape your true self. The Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints(FLDS) headed for now by Warren Jeffs broke off from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the mid 30’s as you will find out from the chart below.

Main branches of the

Latter Day Saint movement

William Bickerton: The Church of Jesus Christ (Pink)

Sidney Rigdon: "Rigdonites"   (Pink)

Granville Hedrick: Church of Christ (Temple Lot) (Turquoise)

Joseph Smith III: Community of Christ (Orange)

James Strang: (Blue)

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Deep Orange)

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS)

Brigham Young  (Green)

Fundamentalist Church of

Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

Warren Jeffs

(Brown)

600px-LDS_main_branch_timeline_svg

If you’ll notice there are many splits off the Original Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Some rejected certain doctrine, some rejected the Book of Mormon, some just didn’t get along with other members so decided to create their own Church. My Question to you Beternun, which branch and reason did your Church branch off? I remember you said you were a member of the COC. Is it The Church of Christ, Community of Christ or am I wrong? Following the Linage Charts from Joseph Smith on I see the COC is one of those branches. So if I’m wrong, please crrect me and tell me the origin of your Church? If you could state the date your Church was founded, by who and by what authority, we could enlighten me on your origins(Your faiths). I can’t imagine you are from the linage of Joseph but from what I see your COC originates with the LDS Church.          Below are some other interesting charts.  

Breakaway churches established before 1844

 

     

Other small churches formed on the basis of disagreements with Smith prior to his murder in 1844 (including church established by William Law within 1844), all of which are now defunct.

 

     

 

Church name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Pure Church of Christ[9]

Wycam Clark

1831

 

Church of Christ

 

Defunct

 

First schismatic sect in the Latter Day Saint movement.

 

Independent Church[10]

– Hoton

[11]

1832

 

Church of Christ

 

Defunct

 

Little is known about this second schismatic sect apart from the date of establishment, the surname of its founder, and that Hoton denounced Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.

[11]

Church of Christ[3]

Ezra Booth

1836

 

Church of the Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Taught that Joseph Smith was not a prophet, and the Book of Mormon was not scripture.

 

Church of Christ (Parri****e)[12]

Warren Parrish

1837

 

Church of the Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Believed that Joseph Smith was a "fallen prophet". Rejected the Book of Mormon and parts of the

Bible.

Alston Church[9]

Isaac Russell

1839

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Taught that the Latter Day Saints should remain in Missouri, and not emigrate to Illinois.

 

Church of Christ[3]

William Chubby

Late 1830s

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Established with the special mission of ministering to

African Americans.

Church of Jesus Christ, the Bride, the Lamb's Wife[9]

George M. Hinkle

1840

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Taught that Joseph Smith was not a prophet, and the Book of Mormon was not scripture.

 

Church of Christ[3]

Hiram Page

1842

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Little is known concerning this sect.

 

These are the break-away Churches established before 1844. All did not survive.

The Churches below it will show many versions of the COC. I'm just Curious, which church is Beternun's?

Community of Christ or other "Josephite" Restorationist churches

 

     

The

Community of Christ and related churches tracing their leadership through Joseph Smith III.

     

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Community of Christ[38]

Joseph Smith III

1860

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; some early members came from Strangite church

 

More than 250,000 members as of 2006

[39]

Second-largest Latter Day Saint denomination. Headquartered in Independence, Missouri. Previously known as the "

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints" (RLDS church); organized by Joseph Smith III in 1860.

Church of the Christian Brotherhood[40]

R. C. Evans

1918

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Split with Reorganized Church over belief that Joseph Smith practiced

plural marriage; Evans published a book documenting evidence that Smith was a polygamist, then went on to reject most of the tenets of Mormonism.

Church of Jesus Christ (Toneyite)[32]

Forrest Toney

1980

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

Left Reorganized Church in 1980; claimed to be "Elijah and only prophet" of his organization.

 

Independent RLDS / Restoration Branches[41]

Various local leaders of the RLDS church

 

1980s

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

As of 1993, 15,000–30,000 sympathizers who yet retained membership in the

RLDS Church (Community of Christ);[42] as of 2011, c. 10,000 members attending several hundred distinct congregations.[43]

Affiliated branches and study groups, with each branch relatively autonomous and the movement as a whole centered in

Independence, Missouri.[41][44] RLDS church branches that became independent of the RLDS church individually throughout the 1980s, due to opposition to changes in RLDS church doctrines and practices. Most priesthood holders of these branches soon became affiliated with the "Conference of Restoration Elders". At a three-day conference in November 2005, the "Joint Conference of Restoration Branches" was formed,[45] which had 6,000 to 7,000 members as of 2010.[46]

Members consider themselves members of the [historical] Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, in a direct line of succession from those who dissented following doctrinal changes roughly coinciding with the RLDS denomination's name change to Community of Christ.[47]

Church of Jesus Christ Restored 1830[32]

Nolan W. Glauner

Mid-1980s

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Members in

Missouri and Africa; headquartered in Tarkio, Missouri

Regards

Wallace B. Smith as a "fallen prophet" of the RLDS church, for opening the priesthood to women and for choosing to build the Independence Temple as opposed to the city of Zion.

Church of Christ[48]

David B. Clark

1985

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Headquartered in

Oak Grove, Missouri

Also known as "

Lion of God Ministry". Clark broke from the RLDS church in November 1985. In May 1987 Clark began to issue a newsletter, "The Return". Group adheres closely to the King James Version of the Bible and "The Record of the Nephites", but does not consider other Mormon scripture to be authoritative. They keep annual feasts, including Passover, Pentecost, Tabernacles, etc.[48]

Church of Jesus Christ (Zion's Branch)[3]

John and Robert Cato, among others

1986

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

200 or so members; headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

Largely composed of former members of the RLDS church who oppose what they consider to be recent doctrinal innovations, especially the giving of the priesthood to women in 1984.

 

Restoration Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints[49]

Several RLDS entities

 

1989

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

The church broke off from the Community of Christ because of its belief that women should not hold the priesthood.

 

Remnant Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints[50]

Frederick N. L****n

2000

 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

1,000–2,000 members; headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

Chiefly composed of former members of the RLDS church who oppose what they consider to be recent doctrinal innovations, especially the passing of the church presidency to someone not descended from Joseph Smith, Jr. (L****n is a descendant of Joseph Smith, Jr. through his grandson

Frederick Madison Smith).

 

Further information:

LDS sects: Hedrickite

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Church of Christ (Temple Lot)[51]

Granville Hedrick

1863

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints; some members from Gladdenites

 

5,000 members; headquartered on the

Temple Lot in Independence, Missouri

Owns the

Temple Lot; adherents commonly referred to as "Hedrickites."

Church of Christ (Fettingite)[52]

Otto Fetting

1929

 

Church of Christ (Temple Lot)

 

Sect divided into various factions

 

A denomination which split with the Temple Lot church over reported revelations from

John the Baptist to its founder, Otto Fetting; adopted sabbatarianism under Apostle S.T. Bronson in 1950s.

Church of Christ at Halley's Bluff[53]

Thomas B. Nerren
and
E. E. Long

1932

 

Church of Christ (Temple Lot)

 

Headquartered at

Schell City, Missouri; less than 100 members

Members originally believed

Otto Fetting's revelations but did not join the Church of Christ (Fettingite). Formally named "Church of Christ at Zion's Retreat" until a 1972 schism in which Dan Gayman led most of its followers away to his Church of Israel.

Church of Christ (Restored)[54]

A.C. DeWolf

ca. 1937

 

Church of Christ (Fettingite)

 

Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri;approx. 450 members

 

Split from Fettingite organization in late 1930s when that sect initially accepted William Draves' "messages"; claims to be the true continuation of Fetting's church. Non-sabbatarian.

 

Church of Christ "With the Elijah Message"[55]

Otto Fetting
and
William Draves

1943

 

Church of Christ (Fettingite)

[52]

c. 12,500 members worldwide as of 1987.

[56][57] Headquartered in Independence, Missouri

Split with the Church of Christ (Fettingite) when that sect rejected revelations from

John the Baptist given to its founder, William Draves, following the death of Otto Fetting.

Church of Christ (Hancock)[3][58]

Pauline Hancock

1946

 

Church of Christ (Temple Lot)

 

Defunct as of 1984

 

First Latter Day Saint denomination to be established by a woman; accepted KJV Bible and Book of Mormon only; later rejected Book of Mormon and dissolved itself in 1984. Among its former members were

Jerald and Sandra Tanner, opponents of the Latter Day Saint movement and founders of the Utah Lighthouse Ministry.

Church of Christ[9]

Howard Leighton-Floyd
and
H. H. Burt

1965

 

Church of Christ with the Elijah Message

 

Around 35 members

 

Leighton-Floyd and Burt Split with the Church of Christ with the Elijah Message during the reincorporation of that church under its present name. Leighton-Floyd left shortly after the formation, with Burt assumed leadership of the group. The membership is centered on an agricultural cooperative near Holden, Missouri.

[59]

Church of Israel[32]

Dan Gayman

1972

 

Church of Christ at Halley's Bluff

 

Headquartered in Missouri

 

Name was "Church of Our Christian Heritage" until incorporation in 1981. The church has been accused of being a

Christian Identity church, a charge which is denied by Gayman. Few Latter Day Saint beliefs or practices remain in the church.

Church of Christ with the Elijah Message (Assured Way of the Lord)[60]

Leonard Draves

2004

 

Church of Christ with the Elijah Message

 

Headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

Split from the Church of Christ with the Elijah Message, Inc., which in turn split from the Church of Christ With the Elijah Message; founders claim that they are the legitimate continuation of William Draves' organization.

 

 

Further information:

Rigdonite

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Church of Jesus Christ of the Children of Zion[3][4]

Sidney Rigdon

1844

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Dissolved by 1847

 

Originally also used the name "Church of Christ". Also known as

Rigdonites.

The Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite)[4]

William Bickerton

1862

 

Organized by former members of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Children of Zion (Rigdonites), by then defunct

 

12,136 as of 2007;

[61] headquartered in Monongahela, Pennsylvania

Adherents commonly referred to as

Bickertonites (church actively opposes use of this term).

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite)[32]

Half of the

Bickertonite Quorum of Twelve Apostles

1907

 

Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite)

 

Defunct

 

Dispute over nature of life in the

millennium split Bickertonite Quorum of the Twelve in two; later merged with the Primitive Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite).

Primitive Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite)[32]

James Caldwell

1914

 

Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite)

 

Defunct

 

Rejected the

First Presidency as a valid leadership organization of the church; later merged with the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonite).

[

edit]

Restorationist churches ("Cutlerite")

 

     

The

Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite) and related churches tracing their leadership through Alpheus Cutler.

     

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite)[5]

Alpheus Cutler

1853

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Approximately 12 members (2010);

[62] headquartered in Independence, Missouri

Adherents commonly called "Cutlerites"; practice "United Order"; retains Nauvoo-era Temple

endowment and Baptism for the Dead.

True Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite)[63]

Clyde Fletcher

1953

 

Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite)

 

Never more than 10; headquartered in

Clitherall, Minnesota

Split from Cutlerites over presidential succession issue; church folded with death of its founder in 1969 and schism was subsequently healed.

 

Restored Church of Jesus Christ[32]

Eugene O. Walton

1980

 

Church of Jesus Christ (Cutlerite)

 

25 members; headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

Split from Cutlerites when they rejected Walton's claim to be the "

One Mighty and Strong".

[

edit]

Restorationist churches ("Strangite")

 

     

The

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite) and related churches tracing their leadership through James Strang.

     

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite)[3]

James J. Strang

1844

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

A few hundred members; headquartered in

Voree (now Burlington) Wisconsin

Currently split between proponents and opponents of incorporation in 1961. Anti-incorporation factions headquartered in

Shreveport, Louisiana and Independence, Missouri

Church of Christ (Aaron Smith)[64]

Aaron Smith

1846

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite)

 

Defunct

 

Short-lived sect formed in

Voree, Wisconsin.

Church of the Messiah[65]

George J. Adams

1861

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite)

 

Defunct

 

Led followers from Maine to Palestine; attempt to establish mission there failed.

 

Holy Church of Jesus Christ[32]

Alexandre R. Caffiaux

1964

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite)

 

Congregations in

France and New Mexico

Caffiaux claimed to be the rightful successor to

James J. Strang. Church headquartered in France.

Church of Jesus Christ (Drewite)[32]

Theron Drew

1965

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite)

 

Extant; one congregation led by Richard Drew, Theron's son

 

Drew organized the church after being excommunicated from the Strangite church, on account of Drew's promotion of

Merl Kilgore as the "One Mighty and Strong" and a potential successor to James Strang.

True Church of Jesus Christ Restored[66]

David Roberts

1974

 

Church of Christ with the Elijah Message and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite)

 

Headquartered in Independence, Missouri

 

Difficult to categorize; Roberts claimed to be Strang's successor.

 

[

edit]

Additional LDS Restorationist churches (usually headquartered in U.S. east of the Rocky Mountains)

 

     

Other "Prairie Saint" branches of the movement, such as the

Church of Christ (Whitmerite), none of which is known to be extant today.

     

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Church of Christ (Wightite)[67]

Lyman Wight

1844

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Extant until around 1958

 

Wight rejected the claims of

leadership made by Brigham Young, William Smith and James Strang. He moved a group of Latter Day Saints to the central Texas frontier. He accepted Joseph Smith III as his father's successor, but did not live long enough to join the RLDS church (though most of his followers later did).

Church of Christ (Whitmerite)[9]

William E. M'Lellin
and
David Whitmer

1847 and 1871

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Extant until around 1925

 

William E. M'Lellin claimed that Joseph Smith, Jr. had designated David Whitmer, one of the Three Witnesses, as his successor. By 1925, most remaining members of the Whitmerite church had united with the Church of Christ (Temple Lot).

Church of Christ (Brewsterite)[9]

James C. Brewster
and
Hazen Aldrich

1848

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Published a periodical entitled The Olive Branch.

 

The Bride, the Lamb's Wife[68]

Jacob Syfritt

1848

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Syfritt claimed to have been taken to heaven to converse with Joseph Smith, who designated him as his true successor.

 

Congregation of Jehovah's Presbytery of Zion[9]

Charles B. Thompson

1848

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Defunct

 

Also called (

Baneemyites and Conjespresites). "Thompson claimed to be "Baneemy" mentioned in The Doctrine and Covenants, D&C 105:27. Said the church had been rejected by God following Joseph Smith's death, and he had been called to renew the priesthood among the gentiles.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Gladdenite)[9]

Gladden Bishop

1851

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

 

Dissolved after Bishop's death in 1865

 

Many members later helped to form the

Church of Christ (Temple Lot).

Pentecostal Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints[69]

Mike Bethel

1994

 

Several different Latter Day Saint sects

[70]

Extant as of 1998; Status currently unknown

 

The sect holds to the canonicity of the Bible and the Book of Mormon, but does not accept other texts in the Latter-day Saint movement such as the

Pearl of Great Price and Doctrine and Covenants.[70]

 

Spontaneous or unknown lineage

 

   

Those sects which originated independent from other organizations and do not trace their doctrinal or priesthood lineage to any 19th-century Latter Day Saint factions, but still hold Latter Day Saint beliefs.

Further information:

Black Mormons: Expansion in West Africa

   

 

Name

 

Organized by

 

Date

 

Split off / Continuation of

 

Current status

 

Notes

 

Independent Latter Day Saint congregations in Nigeria[71]

Anie D. Obot

ca. 1953

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (with LDS Church influences)

 

Extant until around 1978

 

After LDS Church missionaries visited the town of Uyo in 1953, Obot decided to form unauthorized branches of the church in Nigeria and wrote for more information to LDS headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. However, due to Nigerian government visas restrictions and the absence of church leadership, these branches deviated from LDS Church doctrine. This included some practicing of polygamy and establishment their own black priesthood hierarchy, both of which were prohibited at the time by church doctrine.

 

Independent Latter Day Saint congregations in Ghana[72]

Joseph W. B. Johnson

1964

 

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (with LDS and RLDS influences)

 

Extant until around 1978

 

Upon receiving a copy of the Book of Mormon, Johnson started "Latter day Saint" congregations in Ghana independent from any other Latter day Saint sect. In 1976, Johnson went to find "The Mormons" (i.e., the LDS Church) and found the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints instead. However, no further contact was established with the RLDS Church. Upon the announcement of the

Official Declaration—2, allowing those of of African descent into the priesthood, Johnson and most of his group were baptized into the LDS Church.[72]

Apostolic Divine Church of Ghana[72]

Cape Coast group of the independent Latter-Day Saint congregations in Ghana

 

1976

 

Independent Latter-Day Saint congregations in Ghana

 

Extant for only a few months

 

The Cape Coast group of the independent Latter-Day Saint congregations in Ghana (Johnson) schismed when ongoing contact was not established with the LDS or RLDS churches in 1976. Some of the individuals in this group formed the Apostolic Divine Church of Ghana, however, this sect lasted only a few months.

[72]

 

To show that the Church of Jesus Christ had many other splits after our Lord'd Resurection, here's another Chart.

600px-BranchesofChristianity_svg

Hummm,

Skippy

Skippy

Attachments

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Original Post

Thanks, Skippy, for that history and genealogy of the bizarre origins and the subsequent splitting and splintering of the Latter Day Saints movement into dozens of sub-CULTS.  For your information, I am not a "closet" member or any kind of member of any of those heretical factions of Mormonism!  For you to speculate otherwise is to demonstrate your near-total lack of contact with reality, which, of course also  explains much  of the basis for your membership in whatever faction of Mormonism  cranks your tractor.  

I would think that if Contendah is a COC then his church would have its roots in the Restoration Movement. Thomas and Andrew Campbell are often cited as the leaders of this movement. Hence the term Campbellites. Which is a term often used to describe COC's. From what I understand COC base their beliefs solely and firmly on the books of the New Testament. They are strict adherents of not adding to or taking away from those books. So the Book of Mormon would be something they would most definitely shun.

 

I could be wrong, but that has been my understanding.

Originally Posted by DarkAngel:

I would think that if Contendah is a COC then his church would have its roots in the Restoration Movement. Thomas and Andrew Campbell are often cited as the leaders of this movement. Hence the term Campbellites. Which is a term often used to describe COC's. From what I understand COC base their beliefs solely and firmly on the books of the New Testament. They are strict adherents of not adding to or taking away from those books. So the Book of Mormon would be something they would most definitely shun.

 

I could be wrong, but that has been my understanding.

--------------------------------------

I believe thats the way the COC declare themselves, founded in 1906, I have

family in the COC and have learned somethings about them.

 

.

Originally Posted by INVICTUS:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel:

I would think that if Contendah is a COC then his church would have its roots in the Restoration Movement. Thomas and Andrew Campbell are often cited as the leaders of this movement. Hence the term Campbellites. Which is a term often used to describe COC's. From what I understand COC base their beliefs solely and firmly on the books of the New Testament. They are strict adherents of not adding to or taking away from those books. So the Book of Mormon would be something they would most definitely shun.

 

I could be wrong, but that has been my understanding.

--------------------------------------

I believe thats the way the COC declare themselves, founded in 1906, I have

family in the COC and have learned somethings about them.

 

.

Whenever any group of persons decides to follow the New Testament exclusively in faith and practice, that group  will have formed a congregation  of the same church founded by Jesus Christ, irrespective of when they began to live and worship according to the New Testament.  Such a church will have no need for a creed other than the Bible.  It will be organized according to the system of organization described in the New Testament.  That means, among other things, that it will be led by a group of elders, as described in I Timothy  3  and Titus 1.  Churches that vest leadership in a single 'pastor' are not following the New Testament in this important regard.  A true New Testament church will preach the gospel in its fullness and will have nothing to do with the false gospel that tells lost souls that they can be saved by "taking Jesus as your personal savior and saying the 'sinner's prayer.'" There is no example in the new Testament of any lost person being told that this is the way to be saved. It is a truncated, false gospel and is the creation of Satan himself.  If you disagree, then kindly show me where anyone in the New Testament is told by Jesus or by any apostle or evangelist that he should "take Jesus as your personal savior and say the 'sinner's prayer.'"

 

Go to the book of Acts, chapter 2 and see what the inspired apostle Peter told lost people who were p r icked in their hearts, and said to Peter and the rest of the apostles, 'Men and brethren, what shall we do?'" Those believing and penitent Jews knew that they were condemned and expected that there was something that they needed to do to escape condemnation.  Did the Holy Ghost-led apostle tell them to "take Jesus as your personal savior and say the 'sinner's prayer'"?  He most assuredly did not.  Read Acts 2 and see what Peter did tell these lost souls! 

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