Judge: Make Bills Recognizable to Blind

The government discriminates against blind people by printing money that all looks and feels the same, a federal judge said Tuesday in a ruling that could change the face of American currency.

It's time to do away with currency. lets all just accept the Mark of the Beast (666).



http://www.breitbart.com/news/2006/11/28/D8LMC4600.html
Original Post
One of my blind friends thinks this is long overdue also.

It's not as if the Treasury can't figure out how to do it.

They've already discussed it, and have been working on ideas for the same.

It's time to implement them!
I agree, Shoals. It can't be that big of a change to put some raised dots on one corner of the bills. I think the Treasury Department is full of it. They are "not seeking changes to the $1 bill", so this rules out the effect on the vending machine industry. Regardless, it should be done. I have never thought about it until now, but that's terrible that they can't use their own country's currency.
quote:
Originally posted by NashBama:
Blind people can just buy one of these.


I'm sure every blind person has $300 to blow on something like that...
Yeah... right...

Like someone's gonna' count out loud every single dollar in their pocket.

Who but a thief would want to know how much cash someone is carrying around with them?

The treasury should have implemented the solution a LONG TIME AGO!

But, has anyone ever known this administration to do anything particularly noteworthy (other than lie and spend like a drunken sailor)?
quote:
Originally posted by NashBama:
That's stupid, it would cost billions to completely do away with paper money. Blind people can just buy one of these.

http://tinyurl.com/u3bvd


Okay, I'm just going to take a stab in the dark here, but since opposites attract..I bet your wife is an amazingly compassionate and merciful woman. Wink Just kidding, Nash...all of our personalities, gifts and talents are needed, including your own.
quote:
Originally posted by BradshawBruin02:
quote:
Originally posted by NashBama:
Blind people can just buy one of these.


I'm sure every blind person has $300 to blow on something like that...


People will wait in line to spend $600 for a PS3 only to sell it on ebay for $1500. $300 isn't that hard to get. Besides, even if the government bought them for people who couldn't afford it, it would be cheaper than changing our entire monetary system.
Nash, it is a great device, but wouldn't it be a little embarrassing? Picture this. You are checking out with a line of people behind you and this voice has to announce the amount of each bill you hand the clerk.

I don't think this only a problem for those born blind. There are many legally blind people for different reasons (accidents, diabetes, glaucoma, macular degeneration, vitamin A deficiency). About 1.3 million Americans fall into the catagory of "legally blind". Approximately 135 out of 1000 people over the age of 65 are considered legally blind.

This would help many people, Americans who should be given the right to use the currency in the country where they pay taxes.
quote:
Originally posted by _Joy_:
Picture this. You are checking out with a line of people behind you and this voice has to announce the amount of each bill you hand the clerk.


I heard this discussion on NPR last week. As it turns out, a lot of visually-impaired people will mark, fold or roll a bill in a unique way once they know its denomination. They wouldn't use this device out of the household, more than likely. It would be used at home to organize their dollar bills.

@NashBama: I see your point. I'm aware that it would cost billions to completely revolutionize our currency.
quote:
Originally posted by BradshawBruin02:
I heard this discussion on NPR last week. As it turns out, a lot of visually-impaired people will mark, fold or roll a bill in a unique way once they know its denomination. They wouldn't use this device out of the household, more than likely. It would be used at home to organize their dollar bills.


What if the clerk says "I'm sorry you gave me a one instead of a twenty" and then pockets $19? Does the blind person accuse the clerk of being a thief (when they have no evidence since they did not see it) or do they believe they may have made a mistake when preparing their bills? Unfortunately, there are people who prey on the weaknesses of others. It is sick, but true.
quote:
Originally posted by _Joy_:
What if the clerk says "I'm sorry you gave me a one instead of a twenty" and then pockets $19?


That scenario was also brought up in the NPR broadcast. The man they interviewed said that he typically asks the next person in line to verify that the transaction is correct. This rides on the assumptions that both the clerk and the next person in line are ethical and moral individuals.
quote:
Originally posted by _Joy_:
Nash, it is a great device, but wouldn't it be a little embarrassing? Picture this. You are checking out with a line of people behind you and this voice has to announce the amount of each bill you hand the clerk.

I don't think this only a problem for those born blind. There are many legally blind people for different reasons (accidents, diabetes, glaucoma, macular degeneration, vitamin A deficiency). About 1.3 million Americans fall into the catagory of "legally blind". Approximately 135 out of 1000 people over the age of 65 are considered legally blind.

This would help many people, Americans who should be given the right to use the currency in the country where they pay taxes.


Headphones. Everyone wears them with iPods these days, no one would notice that.

There is also a folding method, something about folding the corners on different bills so they can tell what they are. A $1 has four corners folded, a $5 has 3, $10 has 2, and so on. There are ways to adapt rather than force the government to spend billions by completely changing our system.
quote:
Originally posted by NashBama:
quote:
Originally posted by _Joy_:
Nash, it is a great device, but wouldn't it be a little embarrassing? Picture this. You are checking out with a line of people behind you and this voice has to announce the amount of each bill you hand the clerk.

I don't think this only a problem for those born blind. There are many legally blind people for different reasons (accidents, diabetes, glaucoma, macular degeneration, vitamin A deficiency). About 1.3 million Americans fall into the catagory of "legally blind". Approximately 135 out of 1000 people over the age of 65 are considered legally blind.

This would help many people, Americans who should be given the right to use the currency in the country where they pay taxes.


Headphones. Everyone wears them with iPods these days, no one would notice that.



Okay, so that is a great idea. If they would only let us run the government, everything would be fine. Smiler
Hey, that's what our government needs...a forum where they can talk things through anonymously until they come up with an intelligent decision. Big Grin
quote:
NashBama:"...it would be cheaper than changing our entire monetary system."


Apparently, he hasn't seen Andrew Jackson, Ulysses S. Grant or Benjamin Franklin, or any paper money (except those $1 tips stuffed in his tip jar - where ever THAT may be) in quite some time.

The portraits are larger, some borderless, metal-flake ink, watermarks, imbedded plastic strips, microprinting and a host of other changes have been implemented.


"Most people are now aware that the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) issued newly-designed currency notes beginning in 1996. The current design effort is a response to the need to anticipate potential problems with counterfeiting and to prevent criminals from abusing United States paper currency."


Now... what's this talk about "it would be cheaper than changing our entire monetary system", any way?

No one is talking about "changing our entire monetary system."

Last I checked, our national currency is the Dollar. That's not going to change.

Would someone please wake him up? He MUST be attemtping to break Rip Van Winkle's record.
Shoals Lover: Before you jump all over NashBama, perhaps you should consider all the different things that would be affected by changing our notes. For instance, if notes were printed in different sizes or proportions, think of all the cash registers, bill scanners, vending machines, etc. that would have to be replaced. That's just one example. It would actually cost a lot, and not just to the government. I feel that there needs to be a change to our currency, I just can't think of a smart change that wouldn't cost us too much.
Currency size would not be a consideration, in my estimation.

Rather (and I'm thinking creatively, here) using modified inks, imbedding particles in them (as is already done) or imbedding other things (as is done with the plastic strips) could be done.

I simply refuse to believe that our American ingenuity, creativity and desire to lead by innovation is lost on this simple task!
quote:
Originally posted by BradshawBruin02:
Shoals Lover: Before you jump all over NashBama, perhaps you should consider all the different things that would be affected by changing our notes. For instance, if notes were printed in different sizes or proportions, think of all the cash registers, bill scanners, vending machines, etc. that would have to be replaced. That's just one example. It would actually cost a lot, and not just to the government. I feel that there needs to be a change to our currency, I just can't think of a smart change that wouldn't cost us too much.


Excellent point. Our currency system has worked for how many years? One person complains and we have to spend no telling how much to change things? Sorry, it simply doesn't make sense.

Shoals Lover is going to try and find any reason to jump all over my posts. He/she is probably ticked someone has them on ignore. It's made the forums much more enjoyable on my end Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Shoals Lover:
Currency size would not be a consideration, in my estimation.


Changing the currency size is not a good solution to the problem, but it's far more likely than adding raised bumps or cutting the edges of bills in patterns (which are all recommended solutions by some organization mentioned on the NPR broadcast whose name I cannot remember; bumps fade and patterned edges make bills tear more easily). I personally think changing the texture of each bill type would be a viable solution.
quote:
Originally posted by BradshawBruin02:
Shoals Lover: Before you jump all over NashBama, perhaps you should consider all the different things that would be affected by changing our notes. For instance, if notes were printed in different sizes or proportions, think of all the cash registers, bill scanners, vending machines, etc. that would have to be replaced. That's just one example. It would actually cost a lot, and not just to the government. I feel that there needs to be a change to our currency, I just can't think of a smart change that wouldn't cost us too much.


They are not asking for the one dollar bill to be changed so that vending machine industry will not be adversely effected. Same size...I would think a few dots in the corner would do it. Yeah, the texture idea is good.
How long would the raised bumps last? They would probably flatten down by being in a wallet all day or running through a vending machine. Then you'll have blind people relying on those bumps only to find they are unreadable. I don't think that solution would work.
How often would they have to do that? Wouldn't it be easy for someone to give them worn out bills as change and rip them off? I still think a scanner is the best solution.
This is too hard a thing for the ignorant, stupid, poor, bankrupt, dumb people of the United States to overcome.

We can't figure out how to do this hard, hard thing!

We don't have the imaginativity, creativity, cost-effective know-how, or the tools!

We can't do it, and by God, we shouldn't do it! Those evil, confounded activist liberal judges!

(removing tongue from cheek)

Don't tell me why we can't.

Tell me why we won't!

I simply refuse to believe that our American ingenuity, creativity and desire to lead by innovation is lost on this simple task!

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