http://www.foxnews.com/politic...tate-on-gun-control/

 

It is up to freedom-loving, pro-2nd Amendment Americans to GUARANTEE that our grandchildren, and their grandchildren, have the America that the Founding Fathers created and envisioned, instead of the power-hungry, entitlement-creating mess that we're seeing being promoted before our very eyes today.

'The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it.'

'When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty.'

'And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of resistance? Let them take arms.'

'An elective despotism was not the government we fought for.' - Thomas Jefferson

Original Post
Originally Posted by HIFLYER2:

Been trying to pick up some 22LR and have not been able to find it until now this is a good site for the shooter enjoy.

http://ammofast.com/

I hope those greedy bas*ards are enjoying thescrewing they are giving people.

Here is Bass Pro's price, but as of 3 weeks ago, they are out 

http://www.basspro.com/Remingt...-Ammo/product/40602/

525 rounds for $23.49

Ammo fast $79.00

This is what irrational fear looks like.

On a slightly different subject that I haven't thought on in years, is there still such a thing as 22 short and 22 long ammo ? I can't remember seeing it in years and years. 

 

Originally Posted by seeweed:
Originally Posted by HIFLYER2:

Been trying to pick up some 22LR and have not been able to find it until now this is a good site for the shooter enjoy.

http://ammofast.com/

I hope those greedy bas*ards are enjoying thescrewing they are giving people.

Here is Bass Pro's price, but as of 3 weeks ago, they are out 

http://www.basspro.com/Remingt...-Ammo/product/40602/

525 rounds for $23.49

Ammo fast $79.00

This is what irrational fear looks like.

On a slightly different subject that I haven't thought on in years, is there still such a thing as 22 short and 22 long ammo ? I can't remember seeing it in years and years. 

 

Been trying to get it a bass pro but no avail.  There are people who meet the truck and buy them out every week.  More expensive than usual but far cheaper than my other calibers.  Yes still 22LR and short do not see the short much any more.  

I play what I call the Wal Mart Ammo Lotto - you just have to be there at the right time.  They have a 3 box limit, so one person doesn't buy them all.  They do get them, usually 12-15 boxes at a time.  Same with 9mm. 

 

And 525 at Wal Mart is about $23.  100 9mm is about the same.

 

Bad mix of hoarding and new gun buyers in the market now.  I am guilty of it as well.  Not to hoard, but its so hard to find now that I keep more on hand than I normally would.  I used to keep 300-500 rounds of 9mm.  My wife and I could shoot a couple hundred rounds in a weekend, then replace what we shot that day.  It might take months to find 9mm now at regular prices (and I refuse to pay the higher prices whenever possible), so instead of the 300-500, I keep 1000-1500 rounds on hand. 

 

Same with 22LR - used to be able to go out and buy a box when needed.  Now its so hard to find, I keep 2-3 boxes on hand.  Sometimes I cant even find shells for my shotgun. 

Irrational fear?  I think not.  The dems are well known for their hatred of the second amendment and are still continuing to spread the lie that it only applies to hunting or muskets.  I've even heard dems talk about the abolishment of the 2nd.  Diane Feinstein has stated she would have collected all the guns if she could have gotten the votes.

 

Captain - if you shoot a lot, you may want to look into getting a reloading kit.  I can reload 9mm for $13 per 100 and 45 ACP for $15/100.  Can also reload .223 Rem for 25 cent each.  Components are readily available on the internet.  I ordered 1000 9mm total metal jacket bullets for $84 shipping included on Wednesday and was notified Friday they shipped..  I probably have amassed enough components to last me 10 years, so I've got inflation beat for years to come.  I shoot whenever I want now, shortages or not.  There is a new business called "Tack Drivers Reloading" that has opened near Florence as well.

 

Anybody needing component info can PM me, I've got a lot of resources most don't know about to get what you need.  Need .223 55gr FMJ-BT reloading bullets now?  I've got a site that can get them to you in 4-5 days for 10 cents apiece shipped. They show over 80,000 in stock now.

Originally Posted by HIFLYER2:

Looking at a Dillon now can't decide which 650 to get or step up to a 1050.


I use a single stage at present but have been looking at progressive presses including the Dillon 650.  After much research, I'm now leaning more toward the Hornady AP as the powder drop seems to be better than the Dillon for stick powders (bridging issues with the Dillon) and caliber conversion appears a lot cheaper using the bushings instead of Dillon shell plates.  Also, you can buy multiple hornady powder measure inserts cheaply and use on one powder drop device for multiple calibers.   I think with the Dillon, most buy the whole assembly if they don't want to adjust power measure between calibers.  The Dillon is a beautiful machine, I've just got too much Hornady stuff already to go blue.

Originally Posted by Mr. Hooberbloob:
Originally Posted by HIFLYER2:

Looking at a Dillon now can't decide which 650 to get or step up to a 1050.

You probably already know this, but the 650 has the lifetime no BS guarantee while the 1050 is only covered for three years. 

I did not that makes up my mind a 650 it is thanks

 

You don't need to spend a fortune at first to give it a try.

 

http://www.midsouthshooterssup...m.asp?sku=0000690030

 

There are better kits and systems than the one posted; but you can turn out good ammo with LEE equipment. A Lyman manual is also a good investment. There is also a plethora of informational web sites, such as:

http://www.handloads.com/

http://www.alliantpowder.com/

http://www.hodgdon.com/

 

 

Originally Posted by dogsoldier0513:

Last weekend I ventured into Gander Mountain (Florence store) and saw where all the ammo that Wally World CAN'T get is going.

Yep, the same 100 round (winchester 9mm target) box of ammo you can get for $23-$24 at walmart can be had at Gander Mt for $36-$38.  Just a hair cheaper than $39.99 at the pawn and gun stores.  

 

Their gun prices are about the same way, much higher than they should be.  Great place to go look at stuff you are gonna buy on the internet . I like to buy local when it makes sense, but i'm not paying those prices!

Originally Posted by Capt James T:

We have been looking at reloading.  Havent had the nerve to jump in just yet (up front investment), especially after just dropping a grand on my wifes new aquarium hobby.  We have been collecting and storing our brass in case the day comes

To get going on a good kit with 9mm die set, tumbler, calipers, etc..., you'll be looking at about $450.  For rifle cartridges, you'll spend more for trimmer, swager (military brass), and case gauges.

Originally Posted by Stanky:

You don't need to spend a fortune at first to give it a try.

 

http://www.midsouthshooterssup...m.asp?sku=0000690030

 

There are better kits and systems than the one posted; but you can turn out good ammo with LEE equipment. A Lyman manual is also a good investment. There is also a plethora of informational web sites, such as:

http://www.handloads.com/

http://www.alliantpowder.com/

http://www.hodgdon.com/

 

 

I know, I have friends that reload and have toyed around with it.  If i jump in it will be with at least a middle of the line model unless i find something used from someone who is looking to upgrade. 

 

Ive got to refigure my per shot numbers.  I was at .19 to .23 per shot when i looked at 9mm (i pay about .25 a shot for new ammo).  I must not have been pricing in as much bulk as hoob.  

Originally Posted by Capt James T:
Originally Posted by Stanky:

You don't need to spend a fortune at first to give it a try.

 

http://www.midsouthshooterssup...m.asp?sku=0000690030

 

There are better kits and systems than the one posted; but you can turn out good ammo with LEE equipment. A Lyman manual is also a good investment. There is also a plethora of informational web sites, such as:

http://www.handloads.com/

http://www.alliantpowder.com/

http://www.hodgdon.com/

 

 

I know, I have friends that reload and have toyed around with it.  If i jump in it will be with at least a middle of the line model unless i find something used from someone who is looking to upgrade. 

 

Ive got to refigure my per shot numbers.  I was at .19 to .23 per shot when i looked at 9mm (i pay about .25 a shot for new ammo).  I must not have been pricing in as much bulk as hoob.  

For 9mm:  brass can be reused 10-15 times, so 0.5 cents per case per shot, primers  can be bought at Lawsons for 3.8 cents each after tax, I just bought bullets for 8.4 cents each, and powder will run 0.5 cents per load.  Grand total is 13.2 cents for each 9 mm bullet.  45 ACP is not much more.  Plus you buy in bulk now and you've got inflation beat.

 

I started reloading/handloading handgun & rifle calibers in the late 1960's.  Started with a .38 Lee Loader then a used Pacific "C" press.  Had unrestricted access to a couple of Star progressives in .38 & .45 ACP in the 1970s and was given a old Lyman turret press around 1980.  Churned out thousands of rounds .380, 9mm, .38spl, .357, .44spl, .44 mag, .45acp, 45lc.  And .222, .30 carbine, .30-30, 30-06, 7.62x39mm, and .45-70.

 

But for hand-loading [different from reloading] my press of choice is the "O" frame RCBS Rock Chucker single stage.  It turned out sub moa regularly in ,222, .223, .308, and .270 if I took my time and did my part.

 

My powder measure, scale, trickler, case trimmer, etc are all manual.  I haven’t bought any reloading tools since 1980.  There are faster, easier tools out there but I as I became more interested in hunting, I found myself more interested in quality than quantity plus my initial investment is long since paid for.

 

But I don’t shoot nearly as much center fire handgun/long gun  as I used to.  A couple of state and federal agencies were kind enough to pay me to satisfy my shooting addiction.  The day of my military retirement had me hip shooting Rambo style an M-60.

 

 

So for the past decade, except for annually checking the zero of a .270 prior to deer season, I haven’t done any center-fire rifle.  In fact, most of my reloading stuff is still packed.

 

But that may be fixing to change.  In 1965, I qualified with an M14 at Ft. Jackson.  I’ve wanted one ever since.  I recently purchased a Springfield M1A, NM, or "loaded" as they say.   This rounds out my collection of all small arms I’ve qualified with since on the civilian and military side and all safe[ly] secured.

 

I’ve never loaded shot shells.  Not a skeet/trap shooter, don’t hunt ducks, and dove shells are too cheap.  If I were to load, it would be .410 for rabbits. A box of .410 is around 3x the price of 12 gauge dove.

 

It wasn’t unusual to fire a couple of hundred rounds of .22 or more over every weekend we weren’t hunting.  Semi-auto, bolt and lever action rifles.  Semi auto and single action handguns.

Then the supply dried up.  I’ve never been lucky at WalMart lotto.  Seems as if some folks have an inside track knowing when the deliveries are being made and literally buy them off the truck.  Saw some 325/$25 boxes of Federal at Larry’s in Huntsville.  Can’t remember the last time Academy in Decatur had any.  Far as GM goes, I’ll be ****ed before I’ll pay their outrageous prices.  Last time I was in the one in Florence, they had shelves and shelves of that .17 rimfire and not a single .22.

 

Regarding the .22s.  Used to be the cheapest .22 you could buy was .22 Short.  Now they are the most expensive.  I have two rifles dedicated to .22 Short only.

 

I can’t remember the last time I saw any .22 Long.  I never understood why they ever survived after the introduction of the .22 Long Rifle over a hundred years ago.

 

How many of you have ever seen a .22CB?  When I lived in the city, I used them in a single shot to eradicate some pesky squirrels that wound up in a wild rice and sausage pilau.

 

Save your brass!

If I were going to get into reloading, I would want to do it for my 44mag. Cost is about a dollar a pop now.

On the other hand, the arthritis in my right thumb makes it pretty painful to shoot that 44 much. I'm thinking maybe I could load it with a lesser amt of powder, (after all, I'm not shooting a Kodiak bear) and that, and the cheaper price may make it so I could shoot it more.

Also, before my mom died  last year, I could go into her back yard and shoot all I wanted to. Now, I don't go to the house much (got it rented) and they take a dim view of shooting in my back yard here in beautiful downtown Muscle Shoals.

 

Originally Posted by seeweed:

If I were going to get into reloading, I would want to do it for my 44mag. Cost is about a dollar a pop now.

On the other hand, the arthritis in my right thumb makes it pretty painful to shoot that 44 much. I'm thinking maybe I could load it with a lesser amt of powder, (after all, I'm not shooting a Kodiak bear) and that, and the cheaper price may make it so I could shoot it more.

Also, before my mom died  last year, I could go into her back yard and shoot all I wanted to. Now, I don't go to the house much (got it rented) and they take a dim view of shooting in my back yard here in beautiful downtown Muscle Shoals.

 

Road Puppy says they do it all time, don't worry you will fit right in.    Sorry I just could not resist.

Originally Posted by seeweed:

If I were going to get into reloading, I would want to do it for my 44mag. Cost is about a dollar a pop now.

On the other hand, the arthritis in my right thumb makes it pretty painful to shoot that 44 much. I'm thinking maybe I could load it with a lesser amt of powder, (after all, I'm not shooting a Kodiak bear) and that, and the cheaper price may make it so I could shoot it more.

Also, before my mom died  last year, I could go into her back yard and shoot all I wanted to. Now, I don't go to the house much (got it rented) and they take a dim view of shooting in my back yard here in beautiful downtown Muscle Shoals.

 

+++

 

 

Yep.  I bought a 25 rounds of Black Talon .44 mag  for a trip out west in ‘93.  Still have them.

 

I doubt I’ve fired over a couple hundred rounds of full house .44 mag loads both factory and hot reloads.  But I’ve fired around a thousand of reduced loads replicating the .44 special.

 

Reduced loads puts less stress on the brass and leads to longer shot life.  First thing that usually gives way is the mouth/neck will crack and the brass will ring like a bell and hot loads will cause that in as few as a couple of loads.

 

I knew a guy who blew up a S&W M29.  He thought he was loading a compressed load of a slow burning powder but he mistakenly reloaded a fast burning powder.  Those familiar... Bullseye instead of 2400.  It blew not only the chamber out but the chambers on either side.  And of course the top strap.  I’ve a picture of it.  He survived intact but his pride did not.

 

S&W replaced the gun.

 

Fortunately, I’ve a 100 yard range in my yard.  Back stop is made from stacked truck tires filled with sand three rows deep and five high plus a pine forest behind that.  So far, not even 7mm mags have penetrated the first row.

 

Safety first.

 

All guns are cleared and not handled anytime anyone is down range.

Originally Posted by budsfarm:

 

I started reloading/handloading handgun & rifle calibers in the late 1960's.  Started with a .38 Lee Loader then a used Pacific "C" press.  Had unrestricted access to a couple of Star progressives in .38 & .45 ACP in the 1970s and was given a old Lyman turret press around 1980.  Churned out thousands of rounds .380, 9mm, .38spl, .357, .44spl, .44 mag, .45acp, 45lc.  And .222, .30 carbine, .30-30, 30-06, 7.62x39mm, and .45-70.

 

But for hand-loading [different from reloading] my press of choice is the "O" frame RCBS Rock Chucker single stage.  It turned out sub moa regularly in ,222, .223, .308, and .270 if I took my time and did my part.

 

My powder measure, scale, trickler, case trimmer, etc are all manual.  I haven’t bought any reloading tools since 1980.  There are faster, easier tools out there but I as I became more interested in hunting, I found myself more interested in quality than quantity plus my initial investment is long since paid for.

 

But I don’t shoot nearly as much center fire handgun/long gun  as I used to.  A couple of state and federal agencies were kind enough to pay me to satisfy my shooting addiction.  The day of my military retirement had me hip shooting Rambo style an M-60.

 

 

So for the past decade, except for annually checking the zero of a .270 prior to deer season, I haven’t done any center-fire rifle.  In fact, most of my reloading stuff is still packed.

 

But that may be fixing to change.  In 1965, I qualified with an M14 at Ft. Jackson.  I’ve wanted one ever since.  I recently purchased a Springfield M1A, NM, or "loaded" as they say.   This rounds out my collection of all small arms I’ve qualified with since on the civilian and military side and all safe[ly] secured.

 

I’ve never loaded shot shells.  Not a skeet/trap shooter, don’t hunt ducks, and dove shells are too cheap.  If I were to load, it would be .410 for rabbits. A box of .410 is around 3x the price of 12 gauge dove.

 

It wasn’t unusual to fire a couple of hundred rounds of .22 or more over every weekend we weren’t hunting.  Semi-auto, bolt and lever action rifles.  Semi auto and single action handguns.

Then the supply dried up.  I’ve never been lucky at WalMart lotto.  Seems as if some folks have an inside track knowing when the deliveries are being made and literally buy them off the truck.  Saw some 325/$25 boxes of Federal at Larry’s in Huntsville.  Can’t remember the last time Academy in Decatur had any.  Far as GM goes, I’ll be ****ed before I’ll pay their outrageous prices.  Last time I was in the one in Florence, they had shelves and shelves of that .17 rimfire and not a single .22.

 

Regarding the .22s.  Used to be the cheapest .22 you could buy was .22 Short.  Now they are the most expensive.  I have two rifles dedicated to .22 Short only.

 

I can’t remember the last time I saw any .22 Long.  I never understood why they ever survived after the introduction of the .22 Long Rifle over a hundred years ago.

 

How many of you have ever seen a .22CB?  When I lived in the city, I used them in a single shot to eradicate some pesky squirrels that wound up in a wild rice and sausage pilau.

 

Save your brass!

__________________________

For in-town varmint eradication, consider a .17 pump air rifle, some develop about 2/3rds the power of a .22 LR.. Plus, silent.

Originally Posted by direstraits:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:
 
 

....How many of you have ever seen a .22CB?  When I lived in the city, I used them in a single shot to eradicate some pesky squirrels that wound up in a wild rice and sausage pilau...

__________________________

For in-town varmint eradication, consider a .17 pump air rifle, some develop about 2/3rds the power of a .22 LR.. Plus, silent.

 

+++

 

Right.  These aren’t your granddaddy’s Daisy.

 

Unbelievably accurate.  From high school to adults clubs, they shoot matches with them.

 

Plus they are a whole lot cheaper per shot.

 

Originally Posted by budsfarm:
Originally Posted by direstraits:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:
 
 

....How many of you have ever seen a .22CB?  When I lived in the city, I used them in a single shot to eradicate some pesky squirrels that wound up in a wild rice and sausage pilau...

__________________________

For in-town varmint eradication, consider a .17 pump air rifle, some develop about 2/3rds the power of a .22 LR.. Plus, silent.

 

+++

 

Right.  These aren’t your granddaddy’s Daisy.

 

Unbelievably accurate.  From high school to adults clubs, they shoot matches with them.

 

Plus they are a whole lot cheaper per shot.

 

If I have to take out a pesky squirrel here in the city that is what I use,
I use the pellets tho, not the BBs. as they seem to be more accurate. You can watch a damm BB fly like a curve ball, no idea where it may hit.

Originally Posted by seeweed:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:
Originally Posted by direstraits:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:
 
 

....How many of you have ever seen a .22CB?  When I lived in the city, I used them in a single shot to eradicate some pesky squirrels that wound up in a wild rice and sausage pilau...

__________________________

For in-town varmint eradication, consider a .17 pump air rifle, some develop about 2/3rds the power of a .22 LR.. Plus, silent.

 

+++

 

Right.  These aren’t your granddaddy’s Daisy.

 

Unbelievably accurate.  From high school to adults clubs, they shoot matches with them.

 

Plus they are a whole lot cheaper per shot.

 

If I have to take out a pesky squirrel here in the city that is what I use,
I use the pellets tho, not the BBs. as they seem to be more accurate. You can watch a damm BB fly like a curve ball, no idea where it may hit.

 

+++

 

LOL.

 

Yes.  Pellets in .177, .20, or .22 caliber in some spring, forced air [pumped], or gas fed work for rodent control.

 

And just so anyone thinks air rifles are restricted to "BB" guns balls or pellets, in the who'd a'thunk category, Lewis & Clark had a .46 caliber air rifle with them on their Voyage of Discovery.  The rifle was made in the 1790s.  By comparison a .46 caliber led ball may weigh in around 5x+ a .22 so the air reservoir must have been substantial.

 

Originally Posted by budsfarm:
Originally Posted by seeweed:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:
Originally Posted by direstraits:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:
 
 

....How many of you have ever seen a .22CB?  When I lived in the city, I used them in a single shot to eradicate some pesky squirrels that wound up in a wild rice and sausage pilau...

__________________________

For in-town varmint eradication, consider a .17 pump air rifle, some develop about 2/3rds the power of a .22 LR.. Plus, silent.

 

+++

 

Right.  These aren’t your granddaddy’s Daisy.

 

Unbelievably accurate.  From high school to adults clubs, they shoot matches with them.

 

Plus they are a whole lot cheaper per shot.

 

If I have to take out a pesky squirrel here in the city that is what I use,
I use the pellets tho, not the BBs. as they seem to be more accurate. You can watch a damm BB fly like a curve ball, no idea where it may hit.

 

+++

 

LOL.

 

Yes.  Pellets in .177, .20, or .22 caliber in some spring, forced air [pumped], or gas fed work for rodent control.

 

And just so anyone thinks air rifles are restricted to "BB" guns balls or pellets, in the who'd a'thunk category, Lewis & Clark had a .46 caliber air rifle with them on their Voyage of Discovery.  The rifle was made in the 1790s.  By comparison a .46 caliber led ball may weigh in around 5x+ a .22 so the air reservoir must have been substantial.

 

Very interesting fact that I did not know. Any idea where that rifle is now ? Smithsonian maybe ?

 

I don’t know.  I would have thought Smithsonian or the NRA museum.  I googled Lewis & Clark air rifle whereabouts and there’s a bunch of stuff about it but as far as a location being at either the aforementioned or maybe the Cody museum.  A lot of speculation but nothing definite.

 

There’s one like it at the NRA museum.  Another link said it was sold at auction in 1847 and rediscovered and identified in 1976 but no further.  Strange.  So it maybe in the hands of a private collector.  I didn’t read all the links so it may be in there somewhere.

Originally Posted by direstraits:

"The Girandoni Air Rifle was an airgun designed by Tyrolian inventor Bartholomäus Girandoni circa 1779. The weapon was also known as the Windbüchse ("wind rifle" in German)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girandoni_Air_Rifle

 

Good design, but ahead of the technical capabilities of its time.

 

+++

 

Ahead of the technical capabilities?  I'm not tracking.  Supposedly it performed as advertised and  way ahead of it's time to be sure.  After reading that link and several others including the L&C journals long beforehand which alerted me to the existence of such a rifle, I still don't understand how the reservoir maintained it's integrity.  I can't imagine what the psi would have been to achieve a velocity of a .46 caliber projectile comparable to a .45ACP.  Followed by successive shots.  Amazing!  And oh yeah....ahead of the technical capabilities of it's time.  Jeez, Bud.

 

However, according to the Journals, it did fulfill it's intended purpose of impressing the Native Americans.  H e l l, it impresses everyone to this day!

 

Wonder how effective it would have been at dispatching city dwelling back yard rodents?

 

Originally Posted by budsfarm:
Originally Posted by direstraits:

"The Girandoni Air Rifle was an airgun designed by Tyrolian inventor Bartholomäus Girandoni circa 1779. The weapon was also known as the Windbüchse ("wind rifle" in German)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girandoni_Air_Rifle

 

Good design, but ahead of the technical capabilities of its time.

 

+++

 

Ahead of the technical capabilities?  I'm not tracking.  Supposedly it performed as advertised and  way ahead of it's time to be sure.  After reading that link and several others including the L&C journals long beforehand which alerted me to the existence of such a rifle, I still don't understand how the reservoir maintained it's integrity.  I can't imagine what the psi would have been to achieve a velocity of a .46 caliber projectile comparable to a .45ACP.  Followed by successive shots.  Amazing!  And oh yeah....ahead of the technical capabilities of it's time.  Jeez, Bud.

 

However, according to the Journals, it did fulfill it's intended purpose of impressing the Native Americans.  H e l l, it impresses everyone to this day!

 

Wonder how effective it would have been at dispatching city dwelling back yard rodents?

 _____________________________________________

Quoting from the link:

"The reservoirs themselves, made from hammered sheet iron held together with rivets and sealed by brazing, proved very difficult to manufacture using the techniques of the period and were always in short supply.

 

In addition, the weapon was very delicate and a small break could make it inoperable."

 

Obviously, a good idea, but manufacture was difficult and continued field use caused problems not up to obtainable standards of the day -- else, it would continued to be issued.

 

The weapon was issued to special Austrian sharpshooter units. Because of its rapid fire and silence, the French so feared the weapon Napoleon threatened to execute any soldiers found with the weapon.

 

Canes equipped with air guns were popular as self defense weapons in the Victorian era,  I believe one such was featured in a Sherlock Holmes story.

 

 

Nice.  And very collectable.

 

Mine is made by IBM.  Also got it from Anniston through the NRA DCM program early to mid 1960's.  Paid $20 for it.  And speaking of non traditional military contracts you mention, I have a M1 Garand National Match made by International Harvester.

 

At a gun show in Columbia SC sometime in the 1980s, Beard autographed his book on Carbine Williams for me.

 

I met Williams at a gun show in Charlotte NC in the early 1970s a couple of years before his death.  I regret not having him autograph my M1 carbine.  Or the box my Colt Ace came in.

 

Williams had an interesting life whose career as gun designer began as a part time moonshiner serving time in prison for the murder of a deputy sheriff during a raid on his still.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Marshall_Williams

 

 

Originally Posted by seeweed:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:

 

Found it...maybe...in today's news

 

http://www.thestate.com/2013/0...-makes-for-high.html

  

I’ve met this collector but had no idea.

 

For more information, google Ross E. Beard collection.

 

 

=========

Wow, I wanna go see that !
I am assuming that is Camden S.C. ?

 

+++

 

Yes.

 

And less that 15 years ago it would have been in my back yard and I didn't know it.

 

If you have any interest in antique firearms of the Civil War period, I highly recommend Parham's on Bank St. in Decatur.  He has one of the best museums I've ever seen outside the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond and just as good as any Civil War battle site.  I don't know of a single period piece he doesn't have both North & South.  I go there from time to time just for research.  He used to have estimated prices [for insurance purposes] marked on the tags.  Don't remember if he still does that.

 

http://www.rparhamsrelics.com/

 

Good gift shop too.

 

 

 

Originally Posted by dogsoldier0513:
Originally Posted by direstraits:

I purchased an M-1 carbine from Anniston Army Depot, years ago.  It was made by Remington -- Remington Typewriter Company, that is.  WWII, everybody produced war materiel. 

Remington didn't make M1 Carbines.

______________________________

You are probably using one of several source books that don't include subcontractors.  Only contractors were listed, however, there are M-1 carbines clearly stamped with the subcontractors name.

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