Originally Posted by budsfarm:

Dire,

 

Where on your carbine is it stamped Remington or any variation/abbreviation?

_____________________________

On back of receiver group between the sight and serial number reads "Remington Rand."  Remington Rand was originally Remington Typewriter.

 

Originally Posted by direstraits:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:

Dire,

 

Where on your carbine is it stamped Remington or any variation/abbreviation?

_____________________________

On back of receiver group between the sight and serial number reads "Remington Rand."  Remington Rand was originally Remington Typewriter.

 

+++

 

Yes.  I'm very familiar with R-R.  And it's stamped where it should be.

 

I'd be interested to know what's stamped on the barrel not far behind the front sight.  Should have a manufacturer and possibly a month/year of manufacture.

 

Sometimes the manufacturer stamped on the receiver under the rear sight differs from the barrel manufacture.

 

Thanks.

 

 

Originally Posted by budsfarm:
Originally Posted by direstraits:
Originally Posted by budsfarm:

Dire,

 

Where on your carbine is it stamped Remington or any variation/abbreviation?

_____________________________

On back of receiver group between the sight and serial number reads "Remington Rand."  Remington Rand was originally Remington Typewriter.

 

+++

 

Yes.  I'm very familiar with R-R.  And it's stamped where it should be.

 

I'd be interested to know what's stamped on the barrel not far behind the front sight.  Should have a manufacturer and possibly a month/year of manufacture.

 

Sometimes the manufacturer stamped on the receiver under the rear sight differs from the barrel manufacture.

 

Thanks.

 ___________________________

No stamping there,  The only other markings are on the receiver above the chamber --U.S. Carbine Cal. 30 M1.  Serial number in the 50,000,000 series.  As I stated, if a company had a machine shop, it was doing defense work, many times subcontracting to the actual contractor. Sorry, but my only source is from former worker who is now long gone.  He lacked part of a thumb and was 4F, still contributed to the war effort.

 

 

Back in the early 1960's, I spent a summer working at a small machine shop in Mass.  They had a rifle boring machine that was used to turn out barrels for rifles used in WWII.  If I had to guess, it was for the M1 Garand or the still issued M1903 manufactured by Remington/UMC. 

Originally Posted by budsfarm:

Back in the early 1960's, I spent a summer working at a small machine shop in Mass.  They had a rifle boring machine that was used to turn out barrels for rifles used in WWII.  If I had to guess, it was for the M1 Garand or the still issued M1903 manufactured by Remington/UMC. 

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Probably, at least, turned out barrels and perhaps other parts for a major contractor.  As for how they sometimes obtained the steel -- don't ask!  It met requirements, but don't ask how they got it.

Originally Posted by Ubu:

Just wanted to say I am really, really, really enjoying following this thread.

 

Please carry on...............

 

+++

 

Please join us.

 

Thanks.  And thank Dogsoldier  for putting up with us.

 

Be careful I don't bore you to death with trivia.

 

 

 

Such as...my daddy served in the Navy in the South Pacific during WWII.  He told me stories of Marines who had been issued rifles rifled with only 2 lands and grooves, basically one step above the smoothbores of 1812.  Could not be, I thought.

 

Then in the early 1960's when you could mail order military surplus shipped directly to your home, I like so many others ordered a Remington made M1903.  Paid $35.  And as some of these two groove rifles began to appear, the stories began to surface in some of the, as Jank describes it, gun p o r n magazines.  Accusations were made of sub contractors taking short cuts and endangering our troops.

 

My comment 4 or 2 was meant to be sarcastic as the 2 groove was approved.  It may not be a tack driver, but suitable for battlefield zero and proved it's worth against anything the Japs could throw at it including themselves.  Like Dire said...greeting the Axis.

 

For more information

 

https://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en#fp=d376bad89d5753b2&hl=en&q=springfield+1903+2+groove

 

 

 

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