Stands to reason a disgusting...barbaric...profane law came about because of a disgusting...profane person such as she was...and she lied and said she was raped and became pregnant. Wonder how many are doing that still today?  Abortion....wholesale slaughter that's a money maker!

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Norma McCorvey is pictured. | AP Photo

Norma McCorvey had little more to her name than a pseudonym. But it was the most famous pseudonym in American legal history: Jane Roe. And long after the Supreme Court, in 1973, granted it (and all American women) the right to an abortion “free of interference by the State,” McCorvey lived off her pseudonymous self, first as a pro-choice advocate and then—after an evangelical minister named Flip baptized her in a Texas swimming pool—as a professional pro-lifer.

McCorvey, who died in February at age 69, wrote of her divided life in two autobiographies. But if they ended, like so much Scripture, in redemption, they were largely fiction, filled with sufferings she simply had not endured. (She alleged, for example, that her mother kidnapped her daughter, when in fact she had taken custody of her at McCorvey’s urging.) It was as though the great trauma McCorvey did inarguably suffer was not enough, namely that owing to the law, she had been forced to give birth to a child she did not want.
McCorvey had been taught to deprecate abortion even before she knew what it was. Her parents, Olin and Mary Nelson, had pledged themselves to Jehovah when she was a girl, and McCorvey and her brother had knocked on doors in east Texas with religious literature, hocking “thou shalt nots”—abortion among them.

McCorvey would soon dismiss Jehovah, deciding at age 14 in a state correctional school (where she was sent after running away from home) that God did not exist. She had another realization there too: Sex was not profane. For the sex she enjoyed with a run of girlfriends while in state custody was nothing like the sex she had glimpsed at home—most often between a drunk Mary and someone other than Olin. McCorvey vowed to do things differently.
But a failed marriage at 16 left her with a child she did not want. An alcohol-fueled affair at 19 begat a second child. And although she spent most of her nights in the numb comfort of lesbian bars, McCorvey found herself, at 22, single and pregnant for a third time. She did not want the child. And after her adoption lawyer mentioned that he happened to know Linda Coffee, a lawyer readying to challenge the Texas laws on abortion, Norma McCorvey became Jane Roe—not because she wished to see abortion legalized but because she wished to have one. As she later told the New York Times, “I just wanted the privilege of a clean clinic to get the procedure done.”

Abortion was not yet the political football it would become in this country; the Supreme Court affirmed Roe v. Wade by a 7-2 majority. When, two years later, President Gerald Ford nominated John Paul Stevens to the Supreme Court, Roe was not even mentioned during his confirmation hearings. The Roe ruling, however, soon galvanized those opposed to it. They turned to politics, campaigning for “human life amendments” to kill Roe at its legal root. When legislative efforts failed, they turned to the judiciary, seeking the appointment of like-minded judges. Opposition to abortion turned political, then partisan; the National Right to Life Committee declared the GOP the “party of life.” Politicians conformed—Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan turned pro-life, Ted Kennedy and Al Gore pro-choice. Religion fell in line, too. Whereas in 1976, the Southern Baptist Convention supported most abortions, it opposed most abortions in 1980. Abortion was fast becoming this country’s surest test of political affiliation. And so as to galvanize those who supported it, the pro-choice turned to McCorvey.
At the time, McCorvey was game; she and her partner, Connie Gonzalez, were tired of cleaning homes. And as the years passed, McCorvey helped create one and then another Jane Roe foundation, watched Holly Hunter portray her on TV, wrote her first autobiography (high on cocaine, Valium and pot, she told me) and gave hundreds of speeches—talks all the better for the speaking lessons lawyer Gloria Allred arranged for her. An unwanted pregnancy had become a career.

But it was Jane Roe whom the pro-choice wished to hear from, not McCorvey. And when, in 1995, she accepted Jesus and disavowed Roe (and her homosexuality, too), McCorvey’s life of advocacy began again—just on the other side—with two more foundations, another book and hundreds more speeches about sex and religion, those same two forces that had formed not only Jane Roe but Norma McCorvey, too. “It just hit me like a big squish,” she said of her newfound faith. “It was incredible. I felt all warm inside.”
The pro-choice lament McCorvey’s defection. But looking back over the long arc of her plaintiff-ship, it is clear that McCorvey befit Roe, the whole of it, as no Gloria Steinem could: Like the nation at large, she pledged allegiance to both its survival and its destruction.

 

 

"Verbal Lynching is the political tool used today by dems to silence debate on critical issues."

Original Post

There is a 48-year-old woman, born in Texas, who should be dead right now. In fact, she should have never been born. Forty-three years ago, the Supreme Court decided that the Texas law that prevented Jane Roe from ending the life of her unborn daughter was unconstitutional. But by the time the Supreme Court issued its decision in 1973, she had already been born and adopted by a family—likely not knowing that all that ink spilled in Roe v. Wade was about her. Norma McCorvey was “Jane Roe.”

 

 She claimed then that her pregnancy was the result of a rape, although she became outspokenly pro-life and publicly admitted that this, and virtually every fact on which her case was built, was a lie. Both McCorvey and Sandra Cano, the Doe of Doe v. Bolton—Roe’s companion case from Georgia decided the same day—became outspoken pro-life advocates who swore that their cases were built on lies.

But before the Supreme Court could decide whether McCorvey did have a constitutional right to end her unborn daughter’s life, it had to overcome a procedural obstacle that slowed down the process—a delay that factored into whether her daughter would ever have a family.

Because of that delay, McCorvey had already had the child by the time the Supreme Court issued its decision in January 1973. She had been adopted into a Texas home, perhaps somewhere in the Dallas area where McCorvey lived. The court nevertheless said that McCorvey’s case was not moot since her circumstances were “capable of repetition” because courts would never be able to decide the question during the time of a woman’s pregnancy.

 

Procedural history is never the exciting part of a lawsuit. But for McCorvey’s unborn daughter, the dry complexity of legal procedure is the reason she exists today. Fortunately for a three-year old girl, “the wheels of justice grind slowly,” and by the time the court issued its decision, a Texas family had adopted her. If the courts could have moved more quickly, she (and her family) would have never had that chance.

 

It is unknown to me whether the adoptive family ever even knew that their daughter was the supposedly unwanted child who was the subject of Roe. As far as we know, they raised her not knowing who she was and certainly never telling her.

This week many are talking about the more than 60 million people whose lives have been brutally ended by abortion. And rightly so. The numbers are staggering. Imagine the average attendance at every NFL, NBA, and NHL game – gone. Eliminated. The population of the 18 states in the area from Arkansas and Wisconsin in the East to Idaho and Nevada in the west: gone. More than either the Hispanic or the African American population of the U.S.

It’s horrific. But it’s also personal. And today somewhere, maybe still in Texas, there lives a 48-year-old woman, perhaps with a family and a career of her own, with beautiful children that she loves dearly. Perhaps with a husband and family that can’t imagine life without her. The 58 million other babies deserved that same chance at life. Like McCorvey’s daughter, they were all created in the image of a loving God and would have been loved and wanted by someone. That’s why we fight. That’s #WhyWeMarch.

Jack Hammer posted:

I can't imagine a person more wicked than a abortionist.

Are you pro life naio ?

The woman getting one for no valid reason...and a man that would stay with such a woman...and the people that support such a woman and man in that choice.

Naio posted:

Imagine being such a wicked person that you can't respect that Norma McCorvey became pro-life. Are you pro-life jutu?

Wicked is thinking or suggesting McCorvey would deserve one iota of respect after her lie caused...and is still causing the slaughter of millions of babies. Way to little way to late.

L. Cranston posted:
Jutu posted:
Jack Hammer posted:

I can't imagine a person more wicked than a abortionist.

Are you pro life naio ?

The left is only pro-life for the anchor babies.

The right is only pro-birth. They couldn't care less after the child is born.

Liberals can't think in terms of life itself but lie about the way 
conservatives think in those terms.
 
There's nothing more Phony than a liberal talking life of a child,
Christianity, freedom of country or US Constitution. 
Jack Hammer posted:
L. Cranston posted:
Jutu posted:
Jack Hammer posted:

I can't imagine a person more wicked than a abortionist.

Are you pro life naio ?

The left is only pro-life for the anchor babies.

The right is only pro-birth. They couldn't care less after the child is born.

Liberals can't think in terms of life itself but lie about the way 
conservatives think in those terms.
 
There's nothing more Phony than a liberal talking life of a child,
Christianity, freedom of country or US Constitution. 

One has only to look at Republicans track record to see the truth. I'm sorry the truth hurt your little feelings. Democrats don't care what religion you practice. Democrats follow the Constitution and LOVE America. Can't say the same for Republicans.

Jack Hammer posted:
You're about 100% off form what your liberal MSM will pontificate
every hour of every day, with the bad basement lights you must not 
read much at all. It's OK, Dims aren't known to keep up

 

Instead of keeping up...dems keep making it up!

Jutu posted:
Jack Hammer posted:
You're about 100% off form what your liberal MSM will pontificate
every hour of every day, with the bad basement lights you must not 
read much at all. It's OK, Dims aren't known to keep up

 

Instead of keeping up...dems keep making it up!

Says the Queen of GOP Propaganda. Goebbels would be so proud of you.

Libs still don't get it, not even illegal/anti Americans believe anything Dims
say, anything the liberal MSM does and doesn't believe, whatever the
herd of morons out for the POTUS job won't do for the chance to destroy
this country.
 
All thanks to you commies being caught in the largest actions of treason
commited against both a candidate and sitting US President in the history
of we the people of this nation. Driven by hate on many levels.
 
If the UN takes control of our country, what part of the pie will be shared
with the people the world hates the most, ugly Democrat Americans. 
 

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