Does anyone here keep saltwater tanks with corals? My tank took a downhill turn late last year and I'm looking to slowly start adding some corals back in there, but I'd rather try with some frags first before dropping more money on bigger pieces. Does anyone have any that they can part with for pretty cheap?
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Just lookin' for something kinda hardy for right now. I have a buddy that's supposed to give me some Xenia and Green Star Polyps, but I haven't heard back from him. He must be busy.

I had good luck with zoanthids and candy cane coral before. I really liked those. But if you have an abundance of anything that you're looking to part with for cheap, I'm up for just about anything. I don't really want to spend a lot of money right now. I just want to make sure that whatever I put in there will survive. I'm pretty sure they will. I have a few zoanthid remains that are trying real hard to open back up. It looks like it could happen any day now.
The coral would go in the 10 gallon tank which has a Coralife 50/50 96Watt light.

I have a 30 gallon tank that is fish-only. But right now, it just has a Brittle Starfish in it. My tanks went downhill because I was in a band last year that spent quite a few weekends on the road. But I'm not in the band anymore so I have more time to devote to the maintenance of the tanks.
A 10 gallon tank is too small to setup a reef tank in. The 30 gallon would probably be okay but I think you would need about 275 watts of compact flo. for hard corals.

Reef tanks are hela-expensive and even if you go with compact fluorescent you have to change the bulbs out every 6 months.

If it were me and I wanted a tank that was easier to care for and cheaper I'd think about African Cichlids. I know on my 55 gallon tank by the time I was done I spend over 1500 on salt, rocks, skimmer, and lighting if that gives you any idea what a salt water reef tank is going to end up costing you.
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Ron Pheixising:
A 10 gallon tank is too small to setup a reef tank in. The 30 gallon would probably be okay but I think you would need about 275 watts of compact flo. for hard corals.[QUOTE]

Hey olwiggum, what Ron said here is exactly correct. I worked at Pet Depot for 3 years (a long long time ago) and fish & birds were my department. I strongly suggest you at least use a 30 gallon tank and at least 250 watts. Now if you are heart set on corals, then you'd be better off purchasing new them rather than transporting them from one tank to another, unless you can get at least 15 gallons (or half of your tanks capacity) of the water they were originally in because slapping them in a new tank and with a water balance they are not accustomed to, most likely, they won't survive. Pet stores keep their tanks PH & other chemical balances so that the fish or corals can adjust to new tanks more easily.

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