quote:
Originally posted by SaltyDog:
Lawguy, I remember onepatriot7, but is there someone else named patriotson who was also involved or does Cupid just have the name wrong?


Yes salty , I had the name wrong , its onepatriot I was talking about . Wink
Thank you sassy, but was referring to the fact that unless the defense request it, then why should we have the pril. hearing. sorry for the confussion, To me I have always been curious to the fact that they are both, in alot of ways, alike. therefore wasting alot of time. say it takes 3 months to get to the prelim. hearing, and then another 3 to get to the GJ, then take away one and you save anywhere from 2 to 6 months, just wanted to ask. Because I know on one side of the river that some cases dont come up for a very long time. and thank you very much for your post lawguy. very informative.
quote:
Originally posted by Kat660:
quote:
Originally posted by jjuliesmile@aol.com:
Kat, you are getting this mixed up with the pharmacist that was accused of making a bomb that was actually just playing with firecrackers? Now I know he has a high-powered brother as in the district attorney. I really don't know who the other pharmacist was - just where he worked. The DA's brother never lost his job - he is still working at the same place as always. Does the other one also have a well connected brother?


No, I'm not getting the cases confused, they're totally different. I guess "high-powered" might not be the right term, more like "highly connected" (with money).

When they had David Scoggin's trial, the judge mentioned this pharmacist's case as being the most egregious of the incidents Scoggins and the drug task force was involved in. However, since that case had already been resolved and they'd let the guy plead down to some nothing misdemeanor charge, he was off the hook (as far as criminal charges). Scoggin got the can, and I believe prison time, for accepting (and maybe also soliciting) the bribes. I think the other guy's pharmacist license was probaby suspended for awhile (someone said he'd been selling cars), but he's practicing pharmacy now.


Well if that doesn't take the cake! I cannot believe that. So now we know FOR CERTAIN that there is at least ONE pharmacist that really is nothing more than a licensed drug dealer. Mind blowing. I also heard thru the grapevine that Scogin had to have had some help from some higher powers, as in possibly previous Lauderdale County DA??????????????????? Lord Have Mercy - I cannot believe that cat got his pharmacist license back.
quote:
Originally posted by Kat660:
Also makes you wonder who the pharmacists are who are reporting all these purchases. Seems kind of ironic that we have pharmacists who can get out of huge drug charges by buying a car for the drug task force and then turn around and finger little guys buying cold medicine who might be completely innocent but don't have the money to pay anyone off and have to actually work through the system.


A few things here:

First, it's not always the pharmacists calling to report anything. Pseudoephedrine logs are at any place that sells any item containing pseudoephedrine and is available to any law enforcement officer at any time. Several local Law Enforcemnet Agencies check these regularly.

Second, about this particular pharmacist you've mentioned...I know nothing of this case but I do know that in the medical profession (even for pharmacists and pharmacy techs) that if you get in trouble for Using, Stealing and yes even Selling narcotic pills (even if they came from the pharmacy) that they offer you treatment on a first offense and sometimes on a second offense. So if the court sees that a drug dealing pharmacist is in treatment, normally the case gets dropped or the pharmacist receives some type of probation and gets to keep his license as long as he completes treament.

Third, not that this is the way it happened in the case you're speaking of, but Criminal Cases and Civil Cases do not go hand-in-hand. I know that's your point here, that what Scogins did was unlawful but that's not always the actual case even though that's the way it appeared. In other words, I can be a pharmacist driving home after work and have 50,000 narcotic pills in my 2009 Navigator, stop at store and sell a few pills in the parking lot, drive on down the road and get pulled over and told that I'm under arrest for distribution and possesion, then receive probation because I'm in treatment, retain my license to practice, get another job at a pharmacy, out walking around and working like I'm free and clear to the genearl public and still loose my 2009 Navigator to the Drug Task Force in a Civil Hearing.

Just wanted to make that clear. If in fact Scogins took the SUV on behalf of the Task Force as a donation from the pharmacist before any type of Criminal or Civil Hearing and did away with the case, then yes that would be illegal. And he may have, I'm not arguing that point. I just wanted to clear up that people can not serve the first day in jail for a felony and still loose their property to Law Enforcement.
quote:
Originally posted by dntblnk:
quote:
Originally posted by Kat660:
Also makes you wonder who the pharmacists are who are reporting all these purchases. Seems kind of ironic that we have pharmacists who can get out of huge drug charges by buying a car for the drug task force and then turn around and finger little guys buying cold medicine who might be completely innocent but don't have the money to pay anyone off and have to actually work through the system.


A few things here:

First, it's not always the pharmacists calling to report anything. Pseudoephedrine logs are at any place that sells any item containing pseudoephedrine and is available to any law enforcement officer at any time. Several local Law Enforcemnet Agencies check these regularly.

Second, about this particular pharmacist you've mentioned...I know nothing of this case but I do know that in the medical profession (even for pharmacists and pharmacy techs) that if you get in trouble for Using, Stealing and yes even Selling narcotic pills (even if they came from the pharmacy) that they offer you treatment on a first offense and sometimes on a second offense. So if the court sees that a drug dealing pharmacist is in treatment, normally the case gets dropped or the pharmacist receives some type of probation and gets to keep his license as long as he completes treament.

Third, not that this is the way it happened in the case you're speaking of, but Criminal Cases and Civil Cases do not go hand-in-hand. I know that's your point here, that what Scogins did was unlawful but that's not always the actual case even though that's the way it appeared. In other words, I can be a pharmacist driving home after work and have 50,000 narcotic pills in my 2009 Navigator, stop at store and sell a few pills in the parking lot, drive on down the road and get pulled over and told that I'm under arrest for distribution and possesion, then receive probation because I'm in treatment, retain my license to practice, get another job at a pharmacy, out walking around and working like I'm free and clear to the genearl public and still loose my 2009 Navigator to the Drug Task Force in a Civil Hearing.

Just wanted to make that clear. If in fact Scogins took the SUV on behalf of the Task Force as a donation from the pharmacist before any type of Criminal or Civil Hearing and did away with the case, then yes that would be illegal. And he may have, I'm not arguing that point. I just wanted to clear up that people can not serve the first day in jail for a felony and still loose their property to Law Enforcement.


Well, being a little more familiar with this case than you admit to being, the facts occurred just slightly differently.

The pharmacist PURCHASED a vehicle and DONATED it to the Lauderdale County Drug Force in lieu of felony charges - I believe it was an Expedition or if there is one larger than that. No civil cases here - donations. And just because he is in treatment means he can get his license back? That sorta scares me because of the fact that they say once a person has had an addiction problem, they should change their life and stay away from things that make them want to "use". I would think being surrounded by rooms full of bottled narcotics would be tempting, JMHO.

And as a side note, I have a friend who on 2 different occasions had her prescriptions short (5) pills. They also just so happened to be narcotics. She brought it to their attention and they gave her the medicine. It has never happened to me but I have heard of other occasions. Makes me wonder if I need to be counting my medication when I leave the pharmacy. I never have before - but God knows I pay for it and knowing what I know now, I feel that there is even more of a reason too! Eeker
quote:
Originally posted by jjuliesmile@aol.com:
Well, being a little more familiar with this case than you admit to being, the facts occurred just slightly differently.

The pharmacist PURCHASED a vehicle and DONATED it to the Lauderdale County Drug Force in lieu of felony charges - I believe it was an Expedition or if there is one larger than that. No civil cases here - donations. And just because he is in treatment means he can get his license back? That sorta scares me because of the fact that they say once a person has had an addiction problem, they should change their life and stay away from things that make them want to "use". I would think being surrounded by rooms full of bottled narcotics would be tempting, JMHO.

And as a side note, I have a friend who on 2 different occasions had her prescriptions short (5) pills. They also just so happened to be narcotics. She brought it to their attention and they gave her the medicine. It has never happened to me but I have heard of other occasions. Makes me wonder if I need to be counting my medication when I leave the pharmacy. I never have before - but God knows I pay for it and knowing what I know now, I feel that there is even more of a reason too! Eeker


Ok that's fine. I'm sure that's how that particular case happened. I was just merely pointing to the fact that many people on the forums and out in the general public sometimes see Law Enforcment Agencies riding around in "So&So's" vehicle that was arrested 8 months ago but "So&So" isn't in jail so people automatically think "Pay-Off". When in fact almost 99.9% of the time the defendant got way too lucky in Criminal Court and not so lucky in Civil Court.

On the second thing, you wouldn't believe how many Pharmacist are still working in Pharmacies all over the country that are still practicing that have been to Drug Treatment.

On the third thing, YES, count your medication before you drive away from your Pharmacy. This happens a lot believe it or not. And given the occasion, some people might begin to think you're abusing your medication if you're supposed to have 50 pills left after one week and you only have 30. Just food for thought.
quote:
Originally posted by jjuliesmile@aol.com:
Kat, you are getting this mixed up with the pharmacist that was accused of making a bomb that was actually just playing with firecrackers? Now I know he has a high-powered brother as in the district attorney. I really don't know who the other pharmacist was - just where he worked. The DA's brother never lost his job - he is still working at the same place as always. Does the other one also have a well connected brother?


Connolly wasn't the DA yet when that stuff happened with his brother. Plus, it was a federal case.

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